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THEIR RIDE OF TERROR
Peter Gammons
October 30, 1989
The A's Bob Welch and his wife, Mary Ellen, were badly shaken, as was their new house
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October 30, 1989

Their Ride Of Terror

The A's Bob Welch and his wife, Mary Ellen, were badly shaken, as was their new house

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The news from building inspectors the next day was a little better. "At least it's a yellow card building," said Bob. "The red card houses were condemned and will all be plowed under, and they're all around our place. I feel fortunate that we'll be moving into our new house by next season. It should be better when it's rebuilt." Isn't he afraid of living in a landfill area? What about the Big One? "Maybe I'll build a house in Nebraska," he said. "In 10 years it might have a nice view of the Bay." Welch smiled and then grew serious again. "We love it here," he said. "I've dealt with tougher things—this year." His mother died the day after Dillon was born on July 27. Welch still went out and pitched that night. "That was tougher, because it tore at my heart," he said. "This just plays with my mind."

On Friday afternoon, Welch's mind was messed with again when manager Tony La Russa told him that Dave Stewart and Mike Moore, the winning pitchers in Games 1 and 2, respectively, would start Games 3 and 4. Welch would be rescheduled for Game 5—if there is a Game 5. "I'd have done the same thing," said Welch. "As much as I want to pitch, I want to win the World Series."

In a week of roller-coaster emotions, Welch took on the calm demeanor of a man who has seen it all. As he prepared for his Friday commute, he reached into his pocket to get money for the BART ride. When he pulled his hand out, he was holding a paper stub. "Talk about lucky," he joked. "I won $21,000 yesterday on this lottery ticket." After his week, it would have been only fair.

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