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SHARE AND SHARE ALIKE, KIND OF
Bruce Anderson
October 30, 1989
Baseball's judgment day comes when teams vote how to allot World Series loot
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October 30, 1989

Share And Share Alike, Kind Of

Baseball's judgment day comes when teams vote how to allot World Series loot

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"In New York, it was vicious," says Baltimore coach Elrod Hendricks, a catcher for the Yankees in 1976 and '77. "We'd bring up someone for a month, he'd really help us, and the guys who were making the most money—Catfish [Hunter], Thurman [Munson], [Graig] Nettles, [Ken] Holtzman—would say, 'Screw him.' I would sit back there and laugh."

The '76 Yankees, the best team money could buy, voted not to give anything to the batboys. When it was announced that their Series opponent, the Reds, had given their batboys quarter shares, each worth $6,591, the bighearted Yanks gave each of their kids $100.

In all likelihood, the mix of sinners and saints, the openhanded and the tightfisted, has been pretty constant over the years. The World Series might have seen one perfect game, but it is not likely ever to see a perfect shares meeting. "There is no way to do it perfectly," says Dempsey. "There are not too many accountants playing baseball."

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