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The Question: Do the Olympic Games tend to promote international good will? (asked at Vienna, Austria)
Jimmy Jemail
April 11, 1955
MANFRED VON MAUTNER-MARKHOF JR., Vienna President Austrian-Dutch Society:"Yes. We will regard it as a great honor if Austria gets the 1960 Winter Olympics. Nothing is more important. The good will is tremendous. During the Olympics, our newspapers have nothing but stories of the games. The government, private companies, everyone takes a tremendous interest."
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April 11, 1955

The Question: Do The Olympic Games Tend To Promote International Good Will? (asked At Vienna, Austria)

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MANFRED VON MAUTNER-MARKHOF JR.,
Vienna
President Austrian-Dutch Society:
"Yes. We will regard it as a great honor if Austria gets the 1960 Winter Olympics. Nothing is more important. The good will is tremendous. During the Olympics, our newspapers have nothing but stories of the games. The government, private companies, everyone takes a tremendous interest."

PRINCE PHILIPP ERNST ZU SCHAUMBURG-LIPPE,
B�ckeburg, Germany College student:
"Over the years, yes. In 1956, I hope so. Much depends on how newspapers report the games. The Olympics should help promote friendly contacts. Athletics, like music, is a universal language. Athletes understand each other. The big mistake is to stress national prestige over personal glory."

JULIUS RAAB
Chancellor of Austria:
"It will forever be impossible to see an enemy in the comrade of your sports with whom you have been trying to measure your forces. Audiences watching the sportsmen will come to appreciate other nations. Thus, that atmosphere of humanity, so necessary nowadays, will grow and thrive."

EVA PAWLIK
Europe's 1949 skating champion:
"Not always. In 1956, only the United States or the Soviet Union can win. In America, you have the big college program. The Soviets have the big government push. This can give bad feeling. Already the world is talking. But the big picture is good, because, in sports, everyone learns to lose."

DR. H. DRIMMEL
Minister of Education:
"I'm convinced as a sportsman and as a minister that they do. We must prove that even such a controversy as that between the U.S. and Russia can be reduced to a basis of fair sportsmanship. The Olympics might be what is necessary to stimulate the real Olympic idea among nations."

LLEWELLYN E. THOMPSON JR.
American High Commissioner:
"Yes. Amateur sports tend to develop qualities of fairness and cooperation. They are a form of inter—national language. As long as that language is spoken by sportsmen as true amateurs and not as tools of national ambition, I think the Olympics will aid in international understanding."

ROGER LALLOUETTE
Deputy French High Commissioner:
"If they take place in the spirit of their founder, they promote better international understanding. However, the public should acclaim, in the establishment of a new record, only a conquest of human will, not a success of propaganda tending to prove the superiority of a nation, race or system."

SIR GEOFFREY WALLINGER
British High Commissioner:
"The Olympics are a signpost to better understanding. Man's achievement in creating the physical means for closer exchanges have smoothed the surface. Unfortunately, nationalisms and ideologies have erected psychological barriers, but the fellowship of sports can contribute to lowering these."

ANGELIKA HAUFF, Vienna
Movie star:
"Mostly yes, but sometimes no. Not good is the feeling now between America and Russia. Only you hear of them. Other peoples will race, no? The team score is bad. No country must win. Only the athletes must win. Then, when one from small Austria wins, the whole world knows, no?"

HERIBERT MEISEL, Vienna
Sports editor and radio commentator:
"Yes. Olympics are the high point of sports. A little they help to lift the Iron Curtain. We know, living 50 kilometers from the Iron Curtain. Recently, 2,000 Austrians went to see a soccer game behind the Iron Curtain. At the ski championships, the East and West teams lived in the same camp."

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