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BROOKLYN'S HAPPY STREAK
Robert Creamer
May 02, 1955
The graying old Dodgers won their first 10 games of the season, set a big-league record and delighted their friends, playing so resourcefully that any one who has ever liked baseball just had to like the Dodgers
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May 02, 1955

Brooklyn's Happy Streak

The graying old Dodgers won their first 10 games of the season, set a big-league record and delighted their friends, playing so resourcefully that any one who has ever liked baseball just had to like the Dodgers

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The bubble burst the next night, in a furious, fog-swept game with the Giants. The crowd came out, even though it was raining at first, enough to prompt Duke Snider, still resentful of all the empty seats on the previous day, to say, "To hell with them. I hope it rains till midnight. They don't deserve a ball game."

Deserve it or not, they got one, a great one, and the fact that the Dodgers finally lost it, 5-4, may have been the work of the Fates chastising the Flatbush Faithless. The Dodgers managed to maintain their streak and their great playing through seven innings of this 11th game, but in the eighth inning the tide turned, a sliced hit skidded past Left Fielder Amoros, a hurried relay throw by Shortstop Don Zimmer, playing in place of a slightly injured Pee Wee Reese, bounced past Catcher Campanella into the Dodger dugout, and stunningly, irrevocably, finally, the Giants led and went on to win and stop the fabulous Dodgers of 1955.

Brooklyn came back the next afternoon—last Saturday—to beat the Giants 3-1 in a tough, bitter game, marked by jarring base running by Robinson and by Alvin Dark of the Giants, but on Sunday the Giants ended the story of Brooklyn's streak once and for all in a weird game that went into extra innings a 5-5 tie and ended in an 11-10 victory for the Giants.

The streak was over. The Dodgers still held first place, but the season—the long season of mingled victories and defeats—was beginning. The question the Dodgers and Walter Alston faced was twofold: could the enthusiasm and drive that sparked the streak be revived and maintained? Could the surprisingly effective relief pitching of the streak be regained? If so, good days lie ahead for Brooklyn. If not, 10-game streak notwithstanding, 1955 will seem awfully long to Brooklyn, with its brightest days buried back there in the first 10 days of the season.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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