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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
November 28, 1955
FOOTBALL FILLS THE AIR WITH FOOTBALL, HUNTING YARNS, MIDSEASON CROP, DON CAMPBELL AND THE BLUEBIRD IN SAHARALAND, HORSEMEAT MARKET CHEATED BY A HORSE, O'MALLEY CONTEMPLATES HIS DOME
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November 28, 1955

Events & Discoveries

FOOTBALL FILLS THE AIR WITH FOOTBALL, HUNTING YARNS, MIDSEASON CROP, DON CAMPBELL AND THE BLUEBIRD IN SAHARALAND, HORSEMEAT MARKET CHEATED BY A HORSE, O'MALLEY CONTEMPLATES HIS DOME

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"Let's look at some practical considerations. The average ball club will lose $200,000 a year because of weather—attendance reduced and games postponed. An average of $20,000 will be spent for nylon field covering. A crew of 21 men will be employed to take up the field cover and put it back on. It will cost 50� a year to paint each seat in the conventional ball park. Now the advantages of Mr. Fuller's design are numerous—no revenue lost because of weather, no field protection necessary. The seats would not have to be painted or repaired so frequently, and we might even have theater-type seats. The lighting for night games would be better since it would be directed up toward the dome and not down into the eyes of players and spectators. There would be no shadows of trusses on the playing field."

Mr. Fuller spoke up:

"There would be no shadows of any kind, Walter; and another thing, the burning effect of the sun would be eliminated by the translucent dome and yet spectators would be able to get a tan—without the burn. The grass would grow greener, too; that has been proved."

Mr. O'Malley nodded. "That's an important point, Bucky. As I see it, your design would create a sort of greenhouse atmosphere with the blue skies visible through the openings at the back of the stands. That's extremely important psychologically because baseball is traditionally an outdoor game. Bucky, what seating capacity does your model suggest?"

"Walter," said Bucky, "we thought of 100,000."

Mr. O'Malley shook his head. "I think 52,000 would be more practical, Bucky."

Mr. Fuller nodded: "It could be 52,000 just as easily."

Mr. O'Malley looked at his cigar.

"Oh," he said, "the advantages are endless. No posts or pillars anywhere. Every seat would have an unobstructed view. Well, now. Where do we go from here? Can we purchase the land we need for a stadium? Well, the City of New York has appropriated $100,000 for a study of the Flatbush and Atlantic Avenue area in Brooklyn. Perhaps, in the solving of many problems that must be solved in that area, perhaps as an incident in the rehabilitation of that area, some land will be made available for purchase by the Brooklyn Dodgers. In the meantime, I could not be more pleased with what has been accomplished by Mr. Fuller and the students here at Princeton. When we build our stadium, I surely hope it will be an enclosed stadium, and the Fuller dome seems to me to be practical and economical."

"This stadium would be tremendous from the air," said Mr. Patterson. "It would be a landmark of New York."

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