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THE BIGGEST ELEPHANT EVER KILLED BY MAN
Jose Fenykovi
June 04, 1956
In the dense, wild bush of Angola, in Africa, a hunter tracks and kills the largest animal ever shot on earth
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June 04, 1956

The Biggest Elephant Ever Killed By Man

In the dense, wild bush of Angola, in Africa, a hunter tracks and kills the largest animal ever shot on earth

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"I would like to come about 40 yards closer," I answered, whispering too.

"They are two, and in case they charge we won't have time to maneuver," added Mario. The wind started to change direction. We had to act immediately. About 15 yards forward there was a tree with the trunk slightly inclined, good to rest the arm on for shooting.

"Let us go to that tree," I suggested. "From there we will open fire, although I think it is still too far."

"If you want, I'll go forward," volunteered Mario. "I am younger and faster if it is necessary to run."

"Not at all," I answered, thinking that if Mario were in front of me I would not be able to shoot. Coming near the bent tree I told him: "I'll shoot the big one. You, Mario, make it sure. We both should have an eye on the second."

The two animals remained in the same position, one facing us, the other presenting his huge side.

Leaning my arm on the trunk I aimed at the chest of the largest. The bullet from the .416 Rigby raised a dust of dry mud from the skin of the animal, proof of a hit. At once I shot a second bullet in the same place, and I heard the discharge of my other .416, fired by Mario.

Fortunately for us, the two giants did not attack, but ran. Before he disappeared among the trees I put two bullets into the smaller one. I could see blood gushing from the trunk of my big elephant—a sure sign I had got him in the lungs.

Reloading as we ran, Mario and I, followed by Kukuya and Francisco, took off after our wounded quarry. Now there was no need to study the tracks, as an enormous trail of blood told us which way they went. We did not feel the heat or the burden of the heavy rifles we were running with, so great was the excitement.

In an open space in the jungle the two animals stopped for a moment, but they were too far away for a good shot. As we neared them, they sensed the danger and took off again.

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