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THE BALL: LIVELY OR NOT?
Robert Creamer
June 18, 1956
Here is the baseball that Mickey Mantle and 192 other major leaguers had hit over the fence 745 times by June 11 in 1956. Major league officials and manufacturers claim the ball is exactly the same as it was in 1927, when Babe Ruth and 140 lesser lights had hit only 320 home runs at this point in the season. Yet many players, managers and writers insist that the ball has been made more "lively," and point to the record-breaking year in progress as one indication. The fact that a ball cut in half seems to have just the same innards as it did 29 years ago does not settle the argument. The liveliness of a baseball is determined by how tightly the yarn is woven. So far, no one has proved the yarn is tighter in Mickey's 1956 than it was in Babe's 1927. No one has proved the contrary, either. (For more about the baseball, see page 23.)
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June 18, 1956

The Ball: Lively Or Not?

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Here is the baseball that Mickey Mantle and 192 other major leaguers had hit over the fence 745 times by June 11 in 1956. Major league officials and manufacturers claim the ball is exactly the same as it was in 1927, when Babe Ruth and 140 lesser lights had hit only 320 home runs at this point in the season. Yet many players, managers and writers insist that the ball has been made more "lively," and point to the record-breaking year in progress as one indication. The fact that a ball cut in half seems to have just the same innards as it did 29 years ago does not settle the argument. The liveliness of a baseball is determined by how tightly the yarn is woven. So far, no one has proved the yarn is tighter in Mickey's 1956 than it was in Babe's 1927. No one has proved the contrary, either. (For more about the baseball, see page 23.)

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