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BASKETBALL'S WEEK
Mervin Hyman
January 19, 1959
Unbeaten teams, the rarest species of birds in college basketball, were almost extinct after a hectic week of basket-hustling across the nation. Kentucky was the most prominent to fall, crashing down before Vanderbilt, but the Wildcats were joined by Bradley, St. Francis (Pa.), Villanova and Boston University. Of all the major teams, only Auburn (10-0) and St. Bonaventure (8-0) were still undefeated at week's end.
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January 19, 1959

Basketball's Week

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Unbeaten teams, the rarest species of birds in college basketball, were almost extinct after a hectic week of basket-hustling across the nation. Kentucky was the most prominent to fall, crashing down before Vanderbilt, but the Wildcats were joined by Bradley, St. Francis (Pa.), Villanova and Boston University. Of all the major teams, only Auburn (10-0) and St. Bonaventure (8-0) were still undefeated at week's end.

THE SOUTH

The biggest shocker of all took place in Nashville, where Vanderbilt, scrunching along in a so-so season, upset Kentucky 75-66. Bustling to a 14-point half-time lead on the shooting of Jim Henry and substitute Warren Fiser, Vandy harried Kentucky with a tight man-to-man defense and eventually forced the pressing Wildcats to foul, as unhappy Coach Adolph Rupp grimaced on the sidelines. When it was all over, Henry had 29 points, Vanderbilt had its most glowing SEC victory, and Acting Coach Roy Skinner (see right), filling in for Bob Polk, who is recovering from a heart attack, had his greatest thrill. Explained Skinner: "My boys went out there like it wasn't even Kentucky on the floor." The momentum carried Vanderbilt past Mississippi 79-74. LSU Coach Jay McCreary, who had earlier observed, " Kentucky can be had," found he couldn't get them. Rupp shook up his Wildcats, teamed veteran Johnny Cox with four sophomores and gained a 76-61 triumph over LSU before a national TV audience.

With Kentucky slipping from the SEC lead, Auburn kept the nation's longest winning streak—21 straight—alive, shuffling past Mississippi 60-47 and Florida 63-54 to move into first place. Mississippi State, recovering neatly from its loss to Auburn, had too much Bailey Howell and outscored Alabama 81-64 and Georgia Tech 75-67. Tulane, hardly considered a title threat, raised an eyebrow or two by slapping down favored Tennessee 65-45 as Dickie O'Brien beat the Vol zone defense for 23 points.

North Carolina State and North Carolina, building up to their payoff battle in the ACC, continued to win. State held off Virginia 73-68 and Duke 67-60, while the Tar Heels, sticking to their 1-3-1 zone even when Wake Forest went into a deep freeze, made their shots pay off for a 44-34 victory.

West Virginia, which has made the Southern Conference its private hunting preserve, rolled over Furman 100-66 for its 41st straight league win, then gave the East a look at graceful Jerry West, who scored 32 points in an 89-81 overtime win over Penn State and 23 more to help throttle Canisius 77-66. However, there were some signs that West Virginia's rule may yet be threatened. Young but talented Virginia Tech, led by Bob Ayersman's 34 points, handled George Washington's veterans 86-81 and were still undefeated in conference play. In the Ohio Valley Conference, Tennessee Tech was upset by Murray State 69-61 after downing Western Kentucky 81-73.

THE EAST

Loaded down with unbeaten teams as the week began, the East suddenly found itself with only one after fast-breaking George Washington outran Boston University 78-69, Youngstown shattered St. Francis (Pa.) 87-78, and hot-handed St. Joseph's ended Villanova's dream 82-70. Only St. Bonaventure escaped, and the Bonnies had to overcome big city jitters before beating Iona 68-54 in New York's Madison Square Garden.

St. John's, rated the best in the East, had its hands full with George Washington but rallied to overhaul the Colonials 86-85 when Tony Jackson and Alan Seiden calmly converted four foul shots in the closing minute. Holy Cross began to find itself, romping over Rhode Island 102-62 and ending the seven-game winning streak of Connecticut's Yankee Conference leaders, 74-50. Fordham came out of its slump to trim LIU 86-52 and Army 80-69, while NYU added to Boston University's woes by whomping the Terriers 80-56. Pitt's Don Hennon was as brilliant as ever but he couldn't do it alone; the Panthers succumbed to St. Louis 79-62, Temple 86-63 and Syracuse 70-60.

Dartmouth and Princeton, as expected, were running neck and neck among the Ivies. The Indians had some terrifying moments before edging Yale 52-51 but came back to trounce Columbia 69-40 and Cornell 77-58. Princeton, looking every inch the contender, got super performances from Jim Brangan, Artie Klein and the Belz twins, Herm and Carl, to breeze by Penn 72-57, Yale 71-55 and Brown 66-44.

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