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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
January 26, 1959
NOTRE DAME (CONT.): MORE FACTS, PLEASESirs:I have just read The Facts of the Matter by the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, president of the University of Notre Dame (SI, Jan. 19), as well as the preceding article, Surrender at Notre Dame (SI, Jan. 5).
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January 26, 1959

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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After a few acid remarks she whistled again for the game to begin, threw the ball to my opponent, walked off the field with my stick and tossed it as far as she could into the bushes.

There isn't a hockey player in the Philadelphia area who will ever forget her.
NANCY C. RANSOME
Riverton, N.J.

Sirs:
We were smart enough to run and run hard when The Apple yelled. Run with joy! Oh, that there were more ladies like Miss Applebee to inspire girls to activity instead of halfheartedly allowing girls to participate in mild exercise.

Miss Applebee's drive and enthusiasm inspire joy of doing, pride in accomplishment and love in all who know her.
JANICE METCALF HANSEL
Houston

THE BEST FOOTBALL GAME EVER
Sirs:
If I were Johnny Unitas I'm not sure I would appreciate the fact that Tex Maule, in his piece about the Colt-Giant championship game (The Best Football Game Ever Played, Jan. 5), failed to attribute to Alan Ameche the potent part The Horse plays in Unitas' success as a passer.

Maule apparently is unaware of the phrase "a fleet in being." Just as Britain's main naval power was compelled in World War I to remain close to home waters by the presence of Germany's "fleet in being," leaving the open Atlantic to the "forward passing" U-boats, so Ameche is the "fleet" that prevents opposing defenses from ruthlessly rushing the passer.

Conversely, a great passer does the same thing for such men as Ameche and Jim Brown. Unafraid of the Browns' passing game, the Giants sure ganged up on poor Jim in that playoff game.

The combination of Ameche and Unitas makes it possible for the Colts to divide and conquer.
E. S. KENNEDY
Kansas City, Mo.

PRO FOOTBALL: DEATH TO THE TIE
Sirs:
Now that pro football fans have tasted the sweet suspense of "sudden death" overtime (SI, Jan. 5 & 19), why don't the rulemakers get together quickly and make overtime play to a decision a permanent part of all football—high school, college and professional? Tie games are for the birds.
GERALD J. WEIPERT
Detroit

SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR (CONT.)
Sirs:
Great as was Rafer Johnson's triumph in Moscow, perhaps even greater was the success he scored on his little-publicized tour for the State Department during the summer of 1957. While in Pakistan I was privileged to have Rafer spend three days with me in the schools of Karachi as he passed through on his Asian junket. Whether speaking to groups of teachers and college students, staging demonstrations for hundreds of barefoot Pakistani high school youngsters on the playgrounds, or good-naturedly kidding with the crowds of curious urchins who always followed us in the bazaars and streets, he was a perfect ambassador of good will for the U.S. His sincere, friendly, unaffected manner and his willingness to do anything asked of him made a tremendous impression on everyone.

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