SI Vault
 
MEMO from the publisher
Harry Phillips
March 02, 1959
The challenge of the forces of nature to man is primeval. Man's acceptance of it has produced not only the greatest of adventures but many of the most enduring chronicles in sport. Among them are stories which have first appeared in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Examples coming quickly to mind are Tenzing Norgay's account of the first conquest of Everest (SI, April 25, '55); William Albert Robinson's The Ultimate Storm, a tale of trial and victory in a fearful Pacific tempest (SI, May 21, '56); and Joel Sayre's description of running the perilous Colorado (SI, June 16, '58).
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March 02, 1959

Memo From The Publisher

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The challenge of the forces of nature to man is primeval. Man's acceptance of it has produced not only the greatest of adventures but many of the most enduring chronicles in sport. Among them are stories which have first appeared in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Examples coming quickly to mind are Tenzing Norgay's account of the first conquest of Everest (SI, April 25, '55); William Albert Robinson's The Ultimate Storm, a tale of trial and victory in a fearful Pacific tempest (SI, May 21, '56); and Joel Sayre's description of running the perilous Colorado (SI, June 16, '58).

Beginning next week, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED publishes in two parts the previously unpublished diary which Arthur Moffatt kept during an expedition he led into northern Canada in 1955. A naturalist with wanderlust, Moffatt felt that modern machines and instruments unfairly favored man in his contests with the wild. Using no more than paddle, canoe and portage, he set forth with five companions to conquer a lake and river route traversed only once before by white men—in 1893 by the Canadian geologist Dr. J. B. Tyrrell.

Whether raging with rapids or infinitely silent through the cold and eerie tundra, this route held an imperative and quite clear challenge for Moffatt. How his expedition met it is the rare adventure story which Arthur Moffatt's diary begins to tell next week.

Almost at the other end of sport's wide range and also in next week's issue, SPORTING LOOK presents the third of its quarterly series, the Spring Preview for 1959. As observers of the sports scene we are continually impressed by the changes taking place in it. They come nowhere in more refreshing abundance than in the world of fashion.

In its 15 pages SPORTING LOOK includes the newest of clothes for the tournament golfer. Photographed against the background of the Bing Crosby Pro-Am at Pebble Beach, they are at home wherever golf is played. Rose Marie Reid, 1958 winner of a SPORTS ILLUSTRATED American Sportswear Designer Award, offers two versatile swimsuits, right for skin-diving, water skiing, surfing and indeed swimming itself. And for the spectators in the crowd the Preview highlights this season's predominant check patterns; rainwear that also likes the sunny, active life; and the shirtwaist dress, which this year is taking over from the late, unlamented chemises and trapezes.

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