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BUS ON MATCH RACING STARTS
Carleton Mitchell
May 18, 1959
In match race start, Bus (black) applies cardinal rule of always staying between opponent and next mark. If rival (white) attempts Vanderbilt start, black stymies him by jumping on his tail as white begins preparatory run (1) away from line. If white tries to hold to Vanderbilt formula, black follows him to turning point, lets white get slight overlap to windward on return run, then leads white back to line, luffing to upset white's timetable and ultimately crossing starting line ahead of white. If white tries to escape by starting to tack (2), black stays between white and line by luffing head to wind (rules forbid white from then completing tack). White may then bear off sharply, but black turns inside him, coming close alongside (3) and preventing white from jibing. Should white by quick maneuvering manage to complete jibe (4), black jibes inside (5). If white at this point has sufficient overlap to luff black, white will, according to rules, lose luffing rights as soon as his mast comes abeam of black's helm. Should white then manage to slip inside black (6), black still has advantage, since he can once again ruin white's timetable by luffing, or subject white to final indignity of running him onto wrong side of committee boat. White must then return to line while black races on to first mark.
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May 18, 1959

Bus On Match Racing Starts

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In match race start, Bus (black) applies cardinal rule of always staying between opponent and next mark. If rival (white) attempts Vanderbilt start, black stymies him by jumping on his tail as white begins preparatory run (1) away from line. If white tries to hold to Vanderbilt formula, black follows him to turning point, lets white get slight overlap to windward on return run, then leads white back to line, luffing to upset white's timetable and ultimately crossing starting line ahead of white. If white tries to escape by starting to tack (2), black stays between white and line by luffing head to wind (rules forbid white from then completing tack). White may then bear off sharply, but black turns inside him, coming close alongside (3) and preventing white from jibing. Should white by quick maneuvering manage to complete jibe (4), black jibes inside (5). If white at this point has sufficient overlap to luff black, white will, according to rules, lose luffing rights as soon as his mast comes abeam of black's helm. Should white then manage to slip inside black (6), black still has advantage, since he can once again ruin white's timetable by luffing, or subject white to final indignity of running him onto wrong side of committee boat. White must then return to line while black races on to first mark.

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