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The Killer strikes in May
Walter Bingham
June 01, 1959
Shades of 'Damn Yankees'! The Senators have come up with Harmon Killebrew, a real-life counterpart of Joe Hardy!
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June 01, 1959

The Killer Strikes In May

Shades of 'Damn Yankees'! The Senators have come up with Harmon Killebrew, a real-life counterpart of Joe Hardy!

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Through all of this, Killebrew kept trying to change the subject, with no result. His teammates are getting a kick out of his success. Harmon, as the Killer, has become the symbol of the Senator's new prosperity.

KILLER AND BABE

When Killebrew dressed and came on the field the kidding continued. Roy Sievers, looking for a bat to use during hitting practice, ran about trying different ones. "Got to get me a Killer model," he yelled. "Where's a Killer model?" And finding one, letting out a lion's roar, "Ah ha, a Killer model!"

A Detroit player, standing beside Ellis Clary as he hit ground balls to Killebrew, said loudly, "I thought Babe Ruth played the outfield."

People with requests stopped Killebrew every five feet. "Harmon, I'm from a weekly newspaper in Maryland." An A.P. photographer wanted a shot of Harmon holding his bat right at the camera. When the game began, a host of photographers gathered several feet away from home plate when Harmon came to bat, oblivious of foul-ball perils. And when Harmon went to third, the photographers went to third.

The time will come, of course, when the photographers leave, for certainly Killebrew cannot continue to hit home runs at his current pace. When he cools off, the furor will subside. There will be fewer Kiwanis luncheons, fewer Pentagon rendezvous. There will be more time for home, and Killebrew's family won't mind that too much. Meanwhile, though, Washington and its Killer are having themselves a grand time.

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