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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
June 15, 1959
RIDING: REQUIRED READINGSirs:My wife, my two daughters and myself are keen horseback enthusiasts and we want to congratulate you on having the foresight to publish the horsemanship articles (How to Ride a Horse, SI, May 18, 25). They are most timely and well done. Horseback riding is a wonderful sport for both children and adults. As in the case of boating, all members of the family can participate. Riding teaches children how to handle animals, how to do things for themselves and how to enjoy out-of-door living.EMILE ALBERT BEROL Danbury, Conn.
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June 15, 1959

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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RIDING: REQUIRED READING
Sirs:
My wife, my two daughters and myself are keen horseback enthusiasts and we want to congratulate you on having the foresight to publish the horsemanship articles (How to Ride a Horse, SI, May 18, 25). They are most timely and well done. Horseback riding is a wonderful sport for both children and adults. As in the case of boating, all members of the family can participate. Riding teaches children how to handle animals, how to do things for themselves and how to enjoy out-of-door living.
EMILE ALBERT BEROL
Danbury, Conn.

Sirs:
As a galloping grandmother, who keeps her hunters at home, I want to express my approval of Gordon Wright's articles. They are to be standard reading this summer for the young and not-so-young who invade my barn.
MRS. WILLIAM H. LONG
Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Sirs:
I hope that all young riders will clip both articles together so they will always remember the only correct equestrian form.
ERNST MAHLER
Master of Fox Hounds
Tryon Hounds
Neenah, Wis.

Sirs:
Please have an article on jumping soon!
JOAN KEEFE
Wilton, Conn.

Sirs:
This series should be placed on the required reading list for all aspiring equestrians.
G. E. McKISSICK, V.M.D.
Philadelphia

BASEBALL: HEROES SUNG AND UNSUNG
Sirs:
Joe Judge could not bear out my long-held opinion more correctly (Verdict Against the Hall of Fame, SI, June 8). Joe Tinker and Johnny Evers don't deserve a place in the Hall of Fame any more than does Franklin P. Adams who wrote the verses that immortalized them. The records show they weren't even an outstanding double-play combination in their time. Adams was merely bemoaning their effectiveness against the Giants in a single series—certainly a small peg on which to hang a halo of immortality.
GERALD CULLINAN
Washington, D.C.

BASEBALL: TREAD SOFTLY
Sirs:
I noted Walter Bingham's report on the new Senator star, Harmon Killebrew (The Killer Strikes in May, SI, June 1), describing the Killebrews' apartment as "sparsely furnished. There were no rugs." I hope the New England philanthropist who kindly loaned rugs to Washington celebrities may have a few recent returns that could be loaned to the latest Washington hero. I am sure The Killer won't lose his present job at third base.
FRANK J. MILLER
San Francisco

BASEBALL: THE COLLEGE GAME
Sirs:
It seems fairly obvious that there is only one honest way to settle the conflict between college and professional baseball (19TH HOLE, May 25), and that is to eliminate the words amateur and professional as far as baseball is concerned.

To illustrate my point, what was better for all baseball than the Northern League, largely composed of college baseball players, that operated so successfully in Vermont during the late 1930s? A perfect proving ground for the majors, a wonderful outlet for the good college player who wanted a further look at baseball, and great for college coaches.
JOHN C. WILLIAMS
Glens Falls, N.Y.

GOLFINGLY, HARRY SPRAGUE (CONT.)
Sirs:
I rote to Harry Sprague after some of his letters in your mag (Dear Mr. Tabor, SI, May 18, 25). They are intresting.

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