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Men: WE WIN 132-104 Women: WE LOSE 41-66
Tex Maule
July 20, 1959
Scoring at the meet (5,3,2,1) helps the weaker team, since the entrant finishing fourth and last is automatically credited with a possibly undeserved point. But this will not prevent victory for either our men or the Russian women. Here, says Tex Maule, is the probable order of finish in each of the 32 events
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July 20, 1959

Men: We Win 132-104 Women: We Lose 41-66

Scoring at the meet (5,3,2,1) helps the weaker team, since the entrant finishing fourth and last is automatically credited with a possibly undeserved point. But this will not prevent victory for either our men or the Russian women. Here, says Tex Maule, is the probable order of finish in each of the 32 events

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100 METERS
One of the eternal verities of sport is that the U.S. continues to breed wonderful sprinters. Latest—one of the best—is Ray Norton, the panther-muscled U.S. champion. His high-speed, floating finish should nip Poynter, lose Ozolin and Bartenyev.
U.S. 8-3

200 METERS
Norton's overdrive, which picks up ground quickly in the closing yards, makes him even tougher at 200 meters. The Russians start well, but they can't match Norton or Vance Robinson at top speed. Norton, Robinson well ahead, then Bartenyev, Konovalov.
U.S. 8-3

400 METERS
Southern's sprint speed, fine kick puts him ahead all the way. Dave Mills, young and inexperienced, can ghost behind Southern for second. The Russians' Grachev a rather distant third and the veteran Ignatyev close to him in fourth. U.S. all the way.
U.S. 8-3

800 METERS
Tom Murphy, a muscular, thoughtful Irishman, has learned to add his wonderful finishing sprint to a hard early pace and is now one of the world's best. Jerome Walters, on a fine, feathery stride, second, ahead of Russians Krivosheyev and Savinkov.
U.S. 8-3

1,500 METERS
Never pick a neophyte in international competition because of the tension involved. But Dyrol Burleson is a rare neophyte. His great strength and a fluid stride should shade capable Jim Grelle, who will hustle to beat Soviet's Sokolov and Momotkov.
U.S. 8-3

5,000 METERS
Dellinger, a thin, intense and relentless runner, gives the United States unaccustomed strength in this race. His strong finish, on top of sustained pace, puts him first, trailed by Russia's Bolotnikov, Artynyuk. Steiglitz, tall, strong, a close fourth, even third.
U.S. 6-5

10,000 METERS
The United States, long a laggard at distances over a half mile, hasn't quite caught up yet. The Russians—fast-finishing Hubert Pyarnakivi and Aleksey Desyatchikov—have times two minutes better than Max Truex or Bob Soth. Max may press them.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

20-KM. WALK
The Russians, with their odd bent-over style, far outclass the U.S. entry in the walk. Vladimir Golubnichy and Anatoli Vedyakov are the best walkers and would be a cinch in the 5 o'clock train rush. Golubnichy, then Vedyakov, our Haluza, Timcoe.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

110-M. HURDLES
Calhoun, with the essential speed for a short race and incomparable hurdling technique, may trail for a few hurdles against Hayes Jones's rocket start. After that, it's Calhoun ahead enough over the last hurdle to hold off Jones. Mikhailov third, Bezerutsky.
U.S. 8-3

400-M. HURDLES
Dick Howard, who upset world-record holder Glenn Davis, has improved rapidly, looks capable soon of breaking 50 seconds. Davis, out with a lame back, will be replaced by Josh Culbreath, but the Americans should still be one-two over Klenin, Lituyev.
U.S. 8-3

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