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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
July 20, 1959
BOXING: BREAK OUT THE SMORGASBORD!Sirs:A very big thank you. The coverage of the heavyweight championship (SI, July 6) was exactly what I looked for. Martin Kane is the smartest fight writer in the business. He not only knows fighting but he can write too. You can't hardly ever find them like that.
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July 20, 1959

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BOXING: BREAK OUT THE SMORGASBORD!
Sirs:
A very big thank you. The coverage of the heavyweight championship (SI, July 6) was exactly what I looked for. Martin Kane is the smartest fight writer in the business. He not only knows fighting but he can write too. You can't hardly ever find them like that.

But he may have a little chicken in him. In his forecast he pegged the whole affair with great skill—and then in the last paragraph, well, you got to go with the champ, you know! Ingo and the artist turned out a layout that looked as if it had been done after the fight, not before.

You needn't look for any fighters out of Rome. All the young men here devote themselves exclusively to pinching female behinds. Entirely different set of muscles involved. Much pleasanter all around and less dangerous. Unless they come up against my daughters, who pinch back.
NUNNALLY JOHNSON
Rome, Italy

?Nunnally Johnson, onetime newspaperman (Columbus Enquirer-Sun; New York Herald Tribune; Brooklyn Daily Eagle) is the writer-director-producer of more good films than even Hollywood can readily recall (among them The Grapes of Wrath, The Gunfighter, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit and The Three Faces of Eve). A Georgian, Johnson replies to suggestions that Tobacco Road was about his kind of people by explaining: "Where I come from we call them the country-club set." One of Johnson's dauntless daughters is Nora Johnson, whom readers will remember as the author of Girls! It's Goal to Go! (SI, Sept. 22).—ED.

Sirs:
I want to congratulate SPORTS ILLUSTRATED on the scoop of the century—Robert Riger's oh-so-prophetic drawing of the so-called big fight. Orchids to Robert Riger, orchids to Ingemar Johansson. Perhaps now we will have a fighting champion; SPORTS ILLUSTRATED got the scoop on Ingemar's view of how the fight would go—and that was exactly how it went. This truly must have been Ingemar's easiest fight. Patterson must learn not to lunge so badly off balance—and who says Birgit took Ingo's mind off his training? Break out the smorgasbord—till the rematch!
TED R. LANDIS
Brookville, Ohio

Sirs:
The Johansson victory over Patterson was the best thing that could have happened to the fight game. No longer will the public have to stand for " Pete Rademacher defenses" or have to put up with childish managerial tactics. For the first time since Patterson won the title in 1956 worthwhile contenders will be given a chance at the championship. Ingemar Johansson is the savior of the fight game.
R. LEBOU
Bridgeport, Conn.

SIRS:
PLEASE ACCEPT KUDOS FROM CHARTER SUBSCRIBERS FOR LATEST SPORTS ILLUSTRATED GRAND SLAM—INGEMAR JOHANSSON, JIMMIE DYKES, MAX CONRAD, RODEO COWBOYS (SI, JULY 6).
J. VESSELS
Austin, Texas

Sirs:
I knew you'd report the fight in an all-out way with photographs as well as words, but the story of Mr. Anderberg's Odyssey added just the most delightfully novel twist to an already wonderful fight presentation. To you should go an Oscar for unique reporting and coverage of this Patterson-Johansson spectacle.
BETTY MALLOY
Cascade, Iowa

Sirs:
For lack of something better let's call it "uncanny perspicacity."

In any event, I've seen you put it to work before, but never better than in your prefight prediction of Ingemar's exploding right.

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