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Hasty House likes to go slow
Joe Hirsch
August 10, 1959
In adapting its European imports to U.S. race tracks, the Hasty House Farm of Billie and Allie Reuben believes in patience. And it has paid off in the most fantastic earnings
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August 10, 1959

Hasty House Likes To Go Slow

In adapting its European imports to U.S. race tracks, the Hasty House Farm of Billie and Allie Reuben believes in patience. And it has paid off in the most fantastic earnings

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"There are other differences, of course," Trotsek continued. "They reshoe frequently abroad, using heavy nails, and when foreign-breds come over here we must take time to let them grow a new foot. Many European horses are accustomed to having their stall doors shut completely and I usually start them off with a large screen to give them privacy but permit the air to circulate. And then they must be ridden differently. Foreign jocks neck-rein a lot with a long hold; our boys reach up with a short hold behind their ears. The keynote of our entire operation is patience and understanding. We think we're going about it the right way."

The record book speaks in Trotsek's behalf.

For two weeks the racing public had been vainly hoping for a climactic meeting between the leading 3-year-old fillies—namely, Resaca, Quill and Silver Spoon—for a convincing demonstration of which is best. Yet none of them showed up at the Delaware Handicap a fortnight ago, where the promised meeting was supposed to take place. And last week only Silver Spoon was present at the Monmouth Oaks. Just to muddy the picture further, the C.V. Whitney filly ran a disappointing third in the latter race to Royal Native and Indian Maid in that order.

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