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LOVE AFFAIR IN SAN FRANCISCO
Mark Harris
September 28, 1959
The object of affection was a ball club, the Giants, who with great difficulty staggered through September toward destiny in the National League pennant race. The city was in love with the ball club, but in this love affair there were moments of doubt, despair, disillusionment. For those who like baseball, or the Giants, or San Francisco, or even love, Sports Illustrated asked Author Mark Harris and Artist Marc Simont to wander around the city, looking and listening, and then to write and sketch this affair of the heart.
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September 28, 1959

Love Affair In San Francisco

The object of affection was a ball club, the Giants, who with great difficulty staggered through September toward destiny in the National League pennant race. The city was in love with the ball club, but in this love affair there were moments of doubt, despair, disillusionment. For those who like baseball, or the Giants, or San Francisco, or even love, Sports Illustrated asked Author Mark Harris and Artist Marc Simont to wander around the city, looking and listening, and then to write and sketch this affair of the heart.

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"My whole summer has been squandered," his host replied.

"You could always turn the radio off," his guest said cheerfully.

"Don't touch that dial," the man commanded.

LEFTY O'DOUL'S

A tense moment at Lefty O'Doul's. The consensus was, after Jones fanned Long, that Manager Rigney had been wise to relieve McCormick, but when Banks singled, and a run scored, the feeling was that McCormick had been removed too soon. The tying run moved up to second base, and when Walt Moryn singled, it scored.

"They can't get past Chicago," somebody said. "They sit up nights figuring ways to lose it."

Noren pinch-hit for Schult, and Sam Jones struck him out.

At Seals Stadium the fans who had resettled themselves during their interrupted journey to the exits unfolded their blankets and spread them once again across their knees. At O'Doul's it looked like an extra-inning game, maybe 12 or 13 innings.

Cepeda flied out.

"Cepeda don't hit in the clutch any more," somebody said.

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