SI Vault
 
LOVE AFFAIR IN SAN FRANCISCO
Mark Harris
September 28, 1959
The object of affection was a ball club, the Giants, who with great difficulty staggered through September toward destiny in the National League pennant race. The city was in love with the ball club, but in this love affair there were moments of doubt, despair, disillusionment. For those who like baseball, or the Giants, or San Francisco, or even love, Sports Illustrated asked Author Mark Harris and Artist Marc Simont to wander around the city, looking and listening, and then to write and sketch this affair of the heart.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 28, 1959

Love Affair In San Francisco

The object of affection was a ball club, the Giants, who with great difficulty staggered through September toward destiny in the National League pennant race. The city was in love with the ball club, but in this love affair there were moments of doubt, despair, disillusionment. For those who like baseball, or the Giants, or San Francisco, or even love, Sports Illustrated asked Author Mark Harris and Artist Marc Simont to wander around the city, looking and listening, and then to write and sketch this affair of the heart.

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

"I'm half Irish and half Italian myself," the teamster said. "That's common here. The first time I heard the name of McCovey I said to the wife, 'The Giants got another Irishman.' But he sure can hit the ball, I'll tell the cockeyed world."

The recorded national anthem at Seals Stadium was played, but midway through it failed, and the teamster was uncertain whether to be embarrassed or amused. The Cubs' lead-off batter flied to left, the teamster held his breath, but Cepeda made the catch.

"It's a hell of a time to start learning left field," he said. The next two Cub batters struck out, and the teamster lit a cigar. "I smoke when the Giants bat. It brings them good luck. They're in first place, ain't they? I love that team."

Danny O'Connell struck out.

"I think it's going to win," the teamster said.

Willie McCovey, who had hit safely in 14 straight games, struck out.

"It's a big league town," he said. "We deserve a big league team."

Willie Mays struck out.

"I don't know why they ever left the Seals go," the teamster said. "The Seals were only a bush team but these are only a bush team either, 18 strike out down there in L. A. and three strike out now and it ain't even 2 o'clock. Why don't they send them back to New York? Send McCovey back to Phoenix, nothing would suit me nicer. I could do better myself. I could at least stuck my bat out in front of the ball. Strike out, strike out, strike out, that's all they do."

A mixed chorus sang of Dual Filter Tareyton Cigarettes, but the breast of the teamster was not soothed. " Rigney's no manager," he said. "I could manage them better, the bums."

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12