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Milwaukee BRAVES
April 11, 1960
Red Schoendienst was out last year but even so the Braves were heavily favored to win the pennant. They failed. Now Red is back, there's a fiery new manager and Milwaukee is favored
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April 11, 1960

Milwaukee Braves

Red Schoendienst was out last year but even so the Braves were heavily favored to win the pennant. They failed. Now Red is back, there's a fiery new manager and Milwaukee is favored

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BASIC ROSTER

NO.

NAME

POSITION

1959 RECORD

1

DEL CRANDALL

C

.257

4

RED SCHOENDIENST

2B

Disabled

9

JOE ADCOCK

1B

.292

13

CHUCK COTTIER

2B

Minors

14

FRANK TORRE

1B

.228

18

FELIX MANTILLA

IF

.215

23

JOHNNY LOGAN

SS

.291

24

LEE MAYE

OF

.300

38

BILL BRUTON

CF

.289

41

ED MATHEWS

SB

.306

43

WES COVINGTON

LF

.279

44

HANK AARON

RF

.355

10

BOB BUHL

P

15-9

16

CARLTON WILLEY

P

5-9

17

BOB RUSH

P

5-6

20

DON MCMAHON

P

5-3

21

WARREN SPAHN

P

21-15

33

LOU BURDETTE

P

21-15

34

JUAN PIZARRO

P

6-2

47

JOEY JAY

P

6-11

Under the conservative hand of Fred Haney the Braves won two straight pennants, each by a comfortable eight games. Even so, Haney's cautious managerial methods were widely criticized. Last year, despite the absence of Red Schoendienst, Haney was expected to win again. When he didn't, the front office allowed him to retire and called in a new manager—excitable, imaginative, talkative Charley Dressen, who was lucky enough to get Schoendienst back (top left).

?CHARLEY'S WAY

The change in spring training atmosphere was dramatic. Haney liked to sun himself on the clubhouse porch, leaving field operations to his coaches, but Dressen was all over the place, scolding, flattering and prodding. Seasoned pitchers like Warren Spahn and Lou Burdette were lining up for pointers on executing the pick-off play; sluggers Hank Aaron and Eddie Mathews (below left) joined the rookies for bunting and sliding practice (" Aaron didn't know how to slide," says Dressen) and welcomed the chance to learn. "This," declared an enthusiastic coach, "is the way a ball club should be run."

The Braves are sticking with the same men. They made no significant trades over the winter and fooled the experts by standing pat on their controversial second-base situation. They are confident that Schoendienst, spark and spirit of the pennant teams, has won his battle with tuberculosis, for which he was operated on last year, and they expect him to handle his position with a good share of his old skill.

?HARD CORE OF TALENT

With or without the Redhead, Milwaukee's established stars form the strongest nucleus in baseball: Spahn, Burdette and Bob Buhl on the mound; Del Crandall behind the plate; Joe Adcock, Johnny Logan and Mathews in the infield; Aaron, Bill Bruton and Wes Covington in the outfield.

Fresh from an awesome year at bat (.355 BA, 123 RBIs), Right Fielder Aaron has established himself as one of the game's great hitters. He and Third Baseman Mathews (46 HRs, 114 RBIs) provide an unmatched one-two punch. Both men are picture hitters: their swings are powerful yet effortless and, whether smashing into a double play or finding the far reaches of County Stadium, they hit the ball solidly and with astonishing force. Aaron's base hits totaled 400 bases, Mathews' 352, one-two in the major leagues for 1959. Both field their positions well, and run and throw with the ease of natural athletes. Close behind them come the hulking Adcock, who blasted 25 home runs; the still-developing Covington, who hit .279 in a puzzling off year; and the aggressive Logan, who hit .291 (18 points above his lifetime average) despite a late-season injury. Del Crandall, a 12-year Brave at the age of 30, is the league's best catcher; playing in 150 games last year, he achieved a career high in hits (133) and RBIs (72) while hitting 21 homers.

?SPAHNIE AND LOU

Spahn and Burdette, backbone of the Braves' staff since the old Boston days, started and won nearly half the team's games. Each worked more than any other pitcher in either league—Spahn 292 innings, Burdette 290—and finished with identical 21-15 records. The dependable Buhl, a rangy 190-pounder, won 15 of his 25 starts and had a 2.86 ERA last season, second-best among the league's regular pitchers.

But Manager Dressen has plans for aces Spahn and Burdette: like it or not (and Spahnie doesn't), they will work less to give the staff's now middle-aged young pitchers a chance to develop. Scheduled to join the regular rotation are Joey Jay (24), Carlton Willey (28) and Juan Pizarro (23). Only Pizarro had an impressive record last year (6-2, almost one strikeout per inning) but Willey and Jay, the Wunderkinder of the 1958 champions, were effective in spots. With six starters available for duty, Dressen hopes to cut the Spahn-Burdette workload by 14 starts each, leaving them close to a full week between assignments. Spahn hasn't had that much rest since his first full major league season in 1946.

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