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Chicago CUBS
April 11, 1960
Tied for seventh in 1957, tied for fifth in 1958, tied for fifth again last year, the Cubs have been improving. It would seem that this year...but no. The higher you go the tougher it gets
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April 11, 1960

Chicago Cubs

Tied for seventh in 1957, tied for fifth in 1958, tied for fifth again last year, the Cubs have been improving. It would seem that this year...but no. The higher you go the tougher it gets

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BASIC ROSTER

NO.

NAME

POSITION

1959 RECORD

1

RICHIE ASHBURN

CF

.266

5

TONY TAYLOR

2B

.280

7

WALT MORYN

RF

.234

8

DALE LONG

1B

.236

9

DEL RICE

C

.207

11

CAL NEEMAN

C

.162

12

DICK GERNERT

1B

.262

14

ERNIE BANKS

SS

.304

15

SAM TAYLOR

C

.269

16

JERRY KINDALL

IF

Minors

20

IRV NOREN

OF

.311

21

GEORGE ALTMAN

OF

.245

25

FRANK THOMAS

3B-OF

.225

33

LOU JOHNSON

RF

Minors

30

DICK DROTT

P

1-2

32

BOB ANDERSON

P

12-13

36

DON ELSTON

P

10-8

38

SETH MOREHEAD

P

0-3

39

MOE DRABOWSKY

P

5-10

40

GLEN HOBBIE

P

16-13

The Cubs have been a second-division team for 13 years. This winter they traded extensively and came up with players as good as Frank Thomas and Richie Ashburn (together, left). The Cubs look better, but the key man—this year, last year, for the past five years—is still Ernie Banks.

?WORDS FROM ERNIE

Banks was standing beside the batting cage in Mesa, Ariz. this spring, watching his teammates hit. Hitting is what the Cubs do best, and on this particular day baseballs were disappearing into the thin mountain air like jets. Banks looked pleased.

"I like the looks of this club," he said at length. "We have a good team. Only trouble is, so does everybody else. I can hardly wait to see how this all turns out."

Because of Banks himself, things can't turn out too badly for the Cubs. Last year the team tied Cincinnati for fifth place, but it was only Banks, with his 45 home runs and 143 runs batted in, that kept people from confusing the Cubs with the last-place Phillies. Banks hits home runs like a man brushing an ash from his sleeve—just a flick of the wrist and it's gone. Ask any pitcher.

?THE RUN SCORERS

Many of the runs Banks batted in last year were scored by Tony Taylor, who hit .280 in the lead-off spot. This year Tony may bat second because the Cubs now have Ashburn, who was leading off for the Phillies when Taylor was in grammar school. Ashburn is 33 now and last year was his worst in the majors, but both he and the Cubs do not believe the end is in sight. The Cubs got another good hitter in Thomas, who also had his worst season. Thomas can hit home runs—for six years he averaged 27 a season—and he is only 30.

So the Cubs will present a very respectable top of the batting order—Ashburn, Taylor, Banks and Thomas. What follows is anybody's guess. First Baseman Dale Long (do you remember when he...?) and Outfielder Walt Moryn are two free-swinging left-handed hitters, the all-or-nothing type. Outfielder George Altman, First Baseman Dick Gernert and Catcher Sam Taylor fit that general description, too. Outfielder Irv Noren is still a fair hitter, and a rookie outfielder named Lou Johnson has been hitting every pitch in sight. Let the members of this merry band have a good day together and the Cubs will score enough runs to win a war.

? DEL RICE?

Trouble is, other teams are going to score well against the Cubs. Chicago fans, spoiled by the fine defense and pitching of the White Sox, may find the Cubs hard to digest. Catching is a Grade A problem. Manager Charlie Grimm named Del Rice captain of the team when spring training began, a curious move. Rice is 37 and spent most of last year as a Milwaukee coach. He has not played regularly since 1953, yet Grimm has said he is counting on old Del to steady the team's young pitching staff. The Cubs also have Sam Taylor (nice hitter, poor catcher) and Cal Neeman (poor hitter, nice catcher). Of the group, Neeman would seem to be the best bet, but the position is definitely a trouble spot. So is third base. Frank Thomas can play it, but poorly, and is better in left field. Jerry Kindall, a weak hitter, may be used there, although second base and shortstop are his positions. Harry Bright, who couldn't make it with the Pirates, pleased Grimm in spring training.

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