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Detroit TIGERS
April 11, 1960
Tactical troubles—at shortstop and first base—still plague the Tigers. But the main problem is strategic: how to stir contented also-rans and give the faithful something really to shout about
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April 11, 1960

Detroit Tigers

Tactical troubles—at shortstop and first base—still plague the Tigers. But the main problem is strategic: how to stir contented also-rans and give the faithful something really to shout about

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BASIC ROSTER

NO.

NAME

POSITION

1959 RECORD

1

EDDIE YOST

3B

.278

2

FRANK BOLLING

2B

.266

3

JOHNNY GROTH

OF

.235

4

CHARLIE MAXWELL

LF

.251

5

GAIL HARRIS

1B

.200

6

AL KALINE

CF

.327

7

HARVEY KUENN

RF

.353

8

ROCKY BRIDGES

SS

.268

9

CHICO FERNANDEZ

SS

.211

10

RED WILSON

C

.263

11

LOU BERBERET

C

.216

29

STEVE BILKO

1B

Minors

36

STEVE BOROS

OF

Minors

14

JIM BUNNING

P

17-13

15

DON MOSSI

P

17-9

16

RAY SEMPROCH

P

3-10

17

FRANK LARY

P

17-10

18

TOM MORGAN

P

1-4

20

RAY NARLESKI

P

4 12

21

PAUL FOYTACK

P

14-14

For years now complacency has made the Tiger a fat cat. No one knows just why, for Detroit hasn't won a pennant since 1945 and hasn't been a serious contender for 10 years. The Tigers are somewhat like the college boy with his gentleman's C: they are always respectable. They finish fourth or fifth, generally play good baseball and titillate fans around the league by knocking off the Yankees with surprising regularity. They win their share, but little more. Why?

?NOT MUCH DRIVE

The talent is certainly there. In Harvey Kuenn and Al Kaline (top left) they have two of the best baseball players in either league. Their four starting pitchers—Paul Foytack (below left), Jim Bunning, Frank Lary and Don Mossi—are strong and reliable. The infield is steady if not sensational.

The Tigers' chief problem seems to be a lack of competitive drive. There has been little pressure on them to win. Detroit is a model baseball town (the Tigers topped one million in home attendance last season for the 14th time in 15 years), and the fans keep the club solidly in the black. They may be disillusioned at times—as last spring, when Detroit lost 15 of its first 17 games—but let the team win two games in a row and the auto assembly lines are humming with Tiger talk, the turnstiles with Tiger fans. The front office has, unwittingly perhaps, encouraged this rose-colored view by praising and rewarding good individual performances too liberally. New President Bill DeWitt met with anguished bleats this winter when he insisted on tying individual salaries to group results.

?PLETHORA OF STARS

As in the past, Detroit had more than its share of individual standouts last year. Kuenn won his first American League batting championship with a .353 mark. Kaline finished second with .327, and hit 27 home runs for the third time in his career. Charlie Maxwell, the third outfielder, batted only .251 (22 points below his lifetime average) but led the team in homers (31) and runs batted in (95). Third Baseman Eddie Yost got on base 292 of his 675 times at the plate, the most effective on-base record in the league. Frank Lary, Jim Bunning and Don Mossi won 17 games apiece, making Detroit the only team in either league to have three pitchers with over 15 victories each.

Yet the Tigers were just one of the pack in team performance. They were fourth in club batting, fifth in club fielding, seventh in club pitching. And they ranked first in no single aspect of club batting, fielding or pitching.

?PLUG THE HOLES

This year's Tigers have tried to remedy two nagging deficiencies: shortstop and first base. Detroit hasn't had a first-rate shortstop since Dick Bartell, a star with the 1940 pennant winners. The last first baseman of note was Rudy York, a member of the 1945 world champions. Manager Jimmy Dykes's winter acquisitions—Chico Fernandez and Steve Bilko—will hardly produce pennants in the style of Bartell and York, but they may be improvements. Rocky Bridges, last year's regular shortstop, is a born hustler who, as Dykes says, "will give you a pretty good job wherever you put him." Rocky last year gave one of his better efforts at the plate, hitting .268 before injuries sent him to the bench (his stand-in, Coot Veal, barely topped .200). But Bridges has never been a full-season ballplayer or a better-than-adequate shortstop; after 10 years around the majors he still fights ground balls and now is a step slower in getting to them. Fernandez has the opposite problem. A gifted athlete, he has an easygoing nature that drifts readily into laziness. After two promising years with the Phillies he suddenly and for no apparent reason fell apart last spring: in some 40 games he batted a paltry .211 and was lackadaisical in the field. Phillie Manager Eddie Sawyer, who some say harbored a grudge, banished Chico to the bench and employed him only rarely as a pinch runner and pinch hitter.

Can Fernandez help the Tigers? A half-serious joke around the Lakeland camp this spring ran: "The Tigers will be O.K. if Fernandez hits Bilko's weight." Big Steve weighed in at 249, so not much is demanded of Chico.

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