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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
April 11, 1960
OF PROPHECY AND PREMONITIONSirs:The parents of your basketball expert must have had a premonition that their son would become a latter-day prophet when they named him Jeremiah. After watching his NCAA forecast (Up for Grabs at the Cow Palace, SI, March 21) turn out 100% correct at San Francisco I must say there is nothing quite so certain as death and Tax.JAY SIMON Oklahoma City
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April 11, 1960

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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OF PROPHECY AND PREMONITION
Sirs:
The parents of your basketball expert must have had a premonition that their son would become a latter-day prophet when they named him Jeremiah. After watching his NCAA forecast (Up for Grabs at the Cow Palace, SI, March 21) turn out 100% correct at San Francisco I must say there is nothing quite so certain as death and Tax.
JAY SIMON
Oklahoma City

?Reader Simon (one of the nation's front-rank sportswriters) might be interested to know that Tax was actually named for a comic strip—an old-time favorite, now dead, called Jerry on the Job. When Tax was delivered, on a kitchen table in Easthampton, Mass. during a blizzard in January 1916, he arrived almost to the minute predicted by the doctor. "Well," said the proud papa, "he sure is Jerry on the job." Said the proud doctor, "Yes, and a good name for him that would be." Said the father, "That's just what it will be."—ED.

Sirs:
Being a Pete Newell fan, I could not believe offense could win over Pete New-ell's defense, but the NCAA finals disproved this decisively.

Credit Ohio State as the definite superior in the finals. Cal was definitely off, but certainly the "Big O" and Cincinnati took everything out of Cal the previous night.

Writer Tax correctly analyzed the champ, but would he still take State in a rematch, knowing Newell and his great California team?
DICK READY
Santa Clara, Calif.

?Yes, he would. Cal had an excellent team; Ohio State had a better one. Pete Newell didn't look for an alibi; neither should Reader Ready.—ED.

SOCIAL CONSERVATION: SUBJECT AND OBJECT
Sirs:
I want to congratulate you on your courageous approach to the over-all problem of human conservation (A New and Human Science, SI, March 28). We have long advocated and attempted to preach the concept that conservation of human beings is the most important social problem facing the nation today. We share your view wholeheartedly that the spiritual and moral welfare of the nation is tied in very closely as a part of man's association and understanding of his natural environment.

We feel very strongly that this human-nature concept is rapidly taking root, and it is my sincere hope that articles such as yours, together with reports and studies, will result in general understanding of the situation by the people of the country.
A. D. ALDRICH
Director, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Tallahassee, Fla.

Sirs:
You have my congratulations for your excellent presentation of the problem which we face in the future. As you know, I am deeply interested in conservation and devote a good part of my time in the Senate to this subject.
FRANK E. MOSS
U.S. Senator, Utah
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
The article is of great interest to me as I am the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on National Water Resources. We held a great number of public hearings, in addition received reports from every state in the Union and from approximately 14 governmental agencies. Most of these point to the need for the right type of recreational development, including areas left as nearly as possible the way they were created.

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