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'The sport will die'
Stirling Moss
August 29, 1960
New restrictions, says one of its finest stars, could kill Grand Prix racing
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August 29, 1960

'the Sport Will Die'

New restrictions, says one of its finest stars, could kill Grand Prix racing

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Finally, I think it is imperative that the manufacturers of racing cars should be allowed to send representatives along to CSI meetings. Had they been consulted earlier, I am convinced the present fracas over Formula I cars would never have arisen.

Grand Prix racing is, and always has been, the fastest, most spectacular and the most highly skilled side of auto sports. These days it is big business and the amounts of money poured into it are enormous. For the big auto and supply companies, however, the investment is fully justified. Hundreds of thousands see the races, and in Europe particularly their products get wide recognition in the press. But how long can the interest be maintained if the public has only the emasculated 1.5-liter cars to watch? Not long, and fortunately that is the conclusion reached by the manufacturers themselves. The FIA approved a temporary Intercontinental Formula for cars with engines having a maximum piston displacement of 2.5-liters. In effect this is the same as the present Formula I. By July of 1961 the FIA will have raised the Intercontinental Formula to "not less than three liters."

Thus the car builders have dented the committee's bureaucratic armor—this is a fine thing. As long as the sport continues to provide worthwhile advertising for manufacturers, it will thrive. The moment people begin to ignore it—and they will if the cars are not exciting, and the drivers, who know best how to make racing exciting, are not given a voice in its management—advertising support will be withdrawn and the sport will die.

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