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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
August 29, 1960
A QUESTION OF THE EYE Sirs: You fellows should get a gold medal yourselves for compiling the Special Olympic Issue (Aug. 15). STEVE BELL San Gabriel, Calif.
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August 29, 1960

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
Are my eyes deceiving me, or does the second lady from the right in the 1932 women's 80-meter hurdles have a higher hurdle than all the rest?
JONATHAN GOLDSTEIN
Great Neck, N.Y.

?The full-length photograph of Japan's Michi Nakanishi {see above) shows her hurdle to be suspended several inches off the track. Deduction: the camera caught Miss Nakanishi knocking the hurdle over.—ED.

A WALK IN THE SUN
Sirs:
Your statements that the 20-and 50-kilometer walking events "couldn't mean less to Americans" and that the U.S. entry will finish far behind and happy for the "free trip" to Rome are absolutely not in keeping with the truth (FORM CHART, Aug. 15). We have a devoted bunch of boys going over to Rome for these two events, and they may well finish not so far behind as you seem to think.

Let us at least hope so and send them every good wish. That, I am sure you will agree, is far preferable to sending them to Rome bitter at the American public which SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is supposed to represent.
ELLIOTT H. DENMAN
Briarwood, N.Y.

?Every good wish indeed, and a cheering "Go, go, go" to Walkers Rudy Haluza, Ronald Zinn, Robert Mimm, Ronald Laird, John Allen and Bruce MacDonald.—ED.

WHAT DID YOU DO? NOTHING
Sirs:
Hats off to Roger Price {How to Crookshank, Aug. 1). I am happy to report that this new and ingenious form of recreation is growing with leaps and bounds, or should I say squats and sulks, in our community. Already an eight-team Crookshank League, consisting of one player per team, has been formed.

Gone is the sight of noisy neighborhood baseball games. Playgrounds are giving way to thriving housing projects. Up Crookshank!
EUGENE WHITBECK
Clarks Summit, Pa.

TAKE IT EASY
Sirs:
Thanks to Roger Price and you, I have found my niche in the world of sports. Count me in as an avid and (for want of a better word) active Crookshanker. Unfortunately, as part of my training, I am forced to discontinue my weekly, strenuous reading of your magazine.
J. DILL
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
After reading How to Crookshank, I have come to the conclusion that it must be the heart of the physical education programs in many schools—and the up-and-coming major sport.
TRUDI SHAFFER
Johnstown, Pa.

SOMETHING HAPPENED
Sirs:
Your comment to a letter in 19TH HOLE (Aug. 15) indicates nothing has happened in the standing broad jump since Ray Ewry jumped 11 feet 4? inches in 1904. Let me draw your attention to Track & Field News, December 1956: Standing broad jump—Bergen, Norway, Nov. 24, 1956: John Evandt claimed world record jump—11 feet 5� inches.
FRANK FANRAK
Philadelphia

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