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HIGH TENSION GOLF
Rex Lardner
October 03, 1960
In last week's issue Rex Lardner told the grim story of the tension that develops whenever women are encountered on the golf course. Now he shows how this kind of tension—in fact, any kind of tension—can be turned back on itself to produce better (or, at least, different) golf. His theories add up to a whole new approach to the game, one by which any duffer can look forward to shooting his age—possibly by his 120th birthday
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October 03, 1960

High Tension Golf

In last week's issue Rex Lardner told the grim story of the tension that develops whenever women are encountered on the golf course. Now he shows how this kind of tension—in fact, any kind of tension—can be turned back on itself to produce better (or, at least, different) golf. His theories add up to a whole new approach to the game, one by which any duffer can look forward to shooting his age—possibly by his 120th birthday

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Now it is well known that people in a state of anger are stronger than when in a calm state. I find this true when I twist the cap off a cider bottle or open a stubborn window or pay a highway toll. Probably you have often experienced the same reaction. If this anger is applied to the golf swing, the player will find he is using something like 105% of his strength—that is, superpower—and the ball will react accordingly.

It may be argued by the relaxation clique that accuracy is sacrificed when extreme power is applied. But when the swing is powerful enough, exact accuracy does not matter. If the ball is hit with any part of the club, using the High Tension system, it will go as far as the most accurate shot by a slow swinger. If height is taken into consideration in the total yardage attained, it goes a great deal farther.

Now to answer some basic questions about High Tension Golf that will naturally arise.

Does not this theory make obsolete all other books of golf instruction?

Undoubtedly the other books on golf instruction served some kind of function at one time. But since we are diametrically opposed in most areas, either they are right or I am right. To answer the question categorically: yes, it does make them obsolete—overnight.

In what specific way does your theory contradict the theories of the so-called experts?

In several ways. It has been advocated that the arms should be loose and dangly just before the swing. I say, nonsense, tighten them up. They say, relax your knees. I say, stiffen them! They say, hit the ball along the ground. I say, hit the ball up in the air—it will go farther.

Does one need any kind of special equipment to apply the principles of High Tension Golf?

Definitely not! Nothing besides clubs and a course to play on. The playing of golf itself, as we have seen, induces High Tension; and if it does not induce enough, a High Tension warmup can be used as a supplement. One of the best ways I know of becoming tense is to play against a woman. Another is to take a lesson from a teaching pro. I ran into a real dynamo of a pro at a club in Yonkers. "Imagine," he said, as he made hammering motions with his fist while we stood looking over his range, "there is a sharp spike driven down from the main nerve in your right shoulder, through your liver, through your right hip socket, through the kneecap, down the right shinbone and through your Achilles tendon, deep in the ground." I closed my eyes and envisioned the prospect.

"Now," he said, straining to lift upward, "when you raise the club-head, think of this same spike as reversing itself and being driven up the ground, through your shinbone, gall bladder and so on and into the big nerve of your left arm." I did so.

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