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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 03, 1960
STILL READYSirs:Thank you for your editorial Freedom to Kill (Sept. 19). We career Coast Guard families can vouch firsthand for lax marine laws, poor enforcement and rock-bottom appropriations for the Coast Guard.
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October 03, 1960

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
Have your so-called football experts gone out of their everlovin' minds? You reviewed Heidelberg College and did not even mention the team that most local and Ohio experts pick to beat Heidelberg for the Ohio Conference title—Muskingum.
CHUCK HARNER
New Concord, Ohio

Sirs:
Haven't you heard that they play football in North and South Dakota?
JAY M. ALLEN
Columbus, Ohio

Sirs:
You apparently deny the very existence of the Missouri Valley Conference!
EDWARD J. KOENIG
Cincinnati

Sirs:
My eyes still ache from searching for something about Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N.C., the NAIA's No. 1 team in the nation last year.
N. S. HAYDEN
Greenville, S.C.

Sirs:
I have come to the conclusion that you don't know a good football team when you see one.
DAN STEIN
Huntington Woods, Mich.

SIGNALS OVER
RE SAN JOSE STATE QUARTERBACK CHON GALLEGOS AND LISTED NINE INTERCEPTIONS IN 1959, WE BLUSH FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERROR. SHOULD HAVE BEEN ZERO INTERCEPTIONS. GALLEGOS GOOD PLAYER, FINE PASSER. PLEASE PRINT THIS CORRECTION OR I'LL BE HOMICIDE VICTIM AT HANDS OF GALLEGOS.
ART JOHNSON
ATHLETIC NEWS DIRECTOR
SAN JOSE STATE COLLEGE

? SPORTS ILLUSTRATED regrets compounding Art Johnson's misdemeanor into a felony, and we're happy to put him right with his quarterback.—ED.

FRONT SEAT
Sirs:
In Europe, gymnastics is not a "minor" sport but the major sport (EDITORIALS, Sept. 19). It is the original form of athletic competition in the world. This alone is evidence enough that gymnastics should not take a back seat in this country.
KIT BURTON
Altadena, Calif.

Sirs:
Let's give greater emphasis to gymnastics. It should be regarded as the foundation of practically all other sports. And it could be taught in all schools without any difficulty—and with infinitely more benefit than many of the subjects passing as education in the schools today.
ROBERT M. SNYDER
Clearwater, Fla.

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