SI Vault
 
THE BIG TEN IN FULL STRIDE
Alfred Wright
October 17, 1960
STORY OF NO. 15'S 103-YARD RUN AND OHIO STATE'S NEW BID FOR POWER
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 17, 1960

The Big Ten In Full Stride

STORY OF NO. 15'S 103-YARD RUN AND OHIO STATE'S NEW BID FOR POWER

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2

The slow progress involved in this kind of football consumes a lot of time. Ohio State was ahead by only 13-0 at half time. But at the start of the third quarter Bill Wentz provided the game with its brightest moment. He took the Illinois kickoff behind his own goal line and ran down the sidelines 103 yards for a touchdown to put the game out of reach of any Illinois surprises.

There may be a lesson in Ohio State's victory. Hayes is an organizer, and in this year of the liberal substitution rule it is the organizers who are going to win. Hayes has divided his team into three units, one defensive, two offensive. His passion for detail is such that when players are not in the game they must sit in particular spots on the bench so there will be no confusion in the coaches' minds where to find a player at a given instant. Hayes sends in each offensive play with a tackle or expendable halfback, taking the last possible advantage of the wild card rule.

"It's the smallest defensive team I ever had," he says, "and maybe the smallest in the Big Ten. I couldn't get away with playing them if I weren't able to platoon them, because the bigger teams would wear them down. But they're quick, which is what you need." They are good, too, and that helps.

1 2