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THE KNIFE AND THE HAMMER
Roy Terrell
October 17, 1960
The World Series was a battle of contrasts—between the stilettolike skills of the singles-hitting Pittsburgh Pirates and the bludgeoning home-run power of the New York Yankees. The Pirates won their games deftly, delicately, with painful little slashes and stabs. The Yankees won theirs by knocking people unconscious with large clubs
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October 17, 1960

The Knife And The Hammer

The World Series was a battle of contrasts—between the stilettolike skills of the singles-hitting Pittsburgh Pirates and the bludgeoning home-run power of the New York Yankees. The Pirates won their games deftly, delicately, with painful little slashes and stabs. The Yankees won theirs by knocking people unconscious with large clubs

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Bob Friend started against Turley and pitched good ball for four innings, striking out six and allowing six hits, most of them bleeders through the infield. The Yankees scored twice in the third when Gil McDougald doubled down the left-field line—the Pirates insisted the ball was foul—and again in the fourth when Turley hit a hanging curve ball for a single with Richardson on base. But Friend's fast ball was whistling and even the Yankees admitted later they were lucky to lead by three runs.

In the fourth the Pirates struckback. Gino Cimoli and Smoky Burgess singled, and Don Hoak followed with a double. This scored one run, put runners on second and third with none out and set up a situation which could have settled the 1960 World Series right there. Another hit would have tied the score and sent Casey Stengel waddling out to remove Turley, and who knows what might have happened then? But Mazeroski's vicious drive went straight into Gil McDougald's glove at third base and it was Murtaugh who pulled out his pitcher, the weak-hitting Friend, for a pinch hitter. With Nelson already in the game, Murtaugh sent up Gene Baker, a right-hand-hitting utility infielder with a .243 average. Baker popped out. Bill Virdon ended the inning by grounding to Richardson. The Pirates didn't know it immediately, but only agony remained for them.

Against the Pirate relief pitchers—Fred Green, Clem Labine, George Witt, Joe Gibbon and Tom Cheney—the Yankees went wild. By the end of the day, Mickey Mantle had two home runs, Richardson a double and two singles, Kubek three singles, Howard a tremendous triple and a single. The Yankees had 19 hits in all, seven of them in that amazing sixth inning. Mantle drove in five runs, tying a Series record held by Tony Lazzeri, Bill Dickey and Ted Kluszewski; his two home runs were both hit right-handed and the second escaped Forbes Field at the 436-foot sign in center field, where no right-handed batter had ever hit a baseball before. When Mantle got through, he had 13 World Series home runs, only two behind Babe Ruth.

Later, the Yankees were not too exhilarated and the Pirates didn't seem too depressed. "Anybody get hurt out there today?" asked Murtaugh. "No? Then we're O.K."

A photographer asked Stengel to look happy. "Hooray for us," Casey said.

3 BOBBY RICHARDSON: THE MOUSE THAT ROARED

The Pirates waved the second game aside as just one of those things; they decided to file it and forget it. But on Saturday the Yankees started in as if Thursday's game had never ended. This time there were no ifs and buts and might-have-beens. This time the Pirates were simply demolished. The score was 10-0 and the game was not as close as it sounds.

Vinegar Bend Mizell started for the Pirates and in the first inning gave up three singles, a walk and a run before turning the ball over to Clem Labine with one out and the bases full. Labine fooled Elston Howard with a good sinker, but Howard topped the pitch slowly down the third-base line, so slowly that it could not be fielded. Another run scored and the bases remained loaded. Bobby Richardson came to bat.

The little second baseman (5 feet 9 inches) is one Yankee that rival pitchers don't mind pitching to with bases occupied. During the regular season Richardson hit just one home run. Never in his life, in the majors, minors or high school, had he hit a bases-loaded homer. "As a matter of fact," Bobby said later, "I've never even hit a three-run homer in the big leagues. I don't get much of a chance. Usually, in a situation like that, all I hear is Casey bellowing 'Hold that gun!' and then he takes me out for a pinch hitter."

This time, because it was only the first inning and the Yankees already had two runs, Casey left him in. Bobby tried to bunt the man in from third, missed, and Labine ran the count to 3 and 2. Then Clem confidently grooved a fast ball. Wee Bobby—to his own astonishment and the stupefaction of the Pirates—smashed a sharp line drive into the left-field stands for a grand-slam home run.

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