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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 17, 1960
THE FANS' SERIESSirs: SPORTS ILLUSTRATED: I love you (Beat 'Em, Bucs!, Oct. 3).SHIRLEY C. LANGLEY Pittsburgh
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October 17, 1960

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Nevertheless, in answer to the age-old controversy of letting the quarterback call the plays: In my opinion, this boy has enough to do what with blocking, faking, passing and running without taking the responsibility for a coach's keeping or losing his job or a school's receiving additional aid from happy alumni—to say nothing of boring or enraging the fans who pay their money to see perfection in football. I am all for letting the quarterbacks call the plays and giving the game to the boys if they let us spectators in free.
RALPH MAGUIRE
New Orleans

OLD NEW FACE
Sirs:
Porter Shreve (FOOTBALL'S SECOND WEEK, Oct. 3), the star of Penn's opening victory over Lafayette, may be a "new face" to college football but he is certainly not a new face to your magazine. You ran his picture four years ago (Jan. 23, 1956), along with both local and national sports stars, when he received the Washington Touchdown Club award for the best prep school player in the Washington area for 1955. He was an outstanding single-wing tailback for St. Albans School at that time, and Penn is very fortunate to have him as they switch back to the single wing this year.
JONATHAN RICKERT
Mackinac Island, Mich.

?See picture.—ED

YOUNG PICKER
Sirs:
I was surprised to find that your writer had picked Washington to beat Navy, Northwestern to beat Iowa, and Pennsylvania to beat Dartmouth. All four members of my family have done better. Our 10-year-old picked 19 out of 22.
RUTH MARCH
Wellesley, Mass.

IRRESISTIBLE LION
Sirs:
Re "Immovable defense is symbolized by Colts' Big Daddy Lipscomb, here toying with Lion Guard Harley Sewell while waiting to see where play is going" (The Fanciest Game in Town, Sept. 26).

The fundamentals of offensive line blocking are to get under the opponent's arms, make contact with his body, straighten him up, and use head, shoulders and forearms to drive him into the cheap seats. In the picture it appears the "toyed with" Lion Guard Harley is a pretty irresistible force, and the "immovable Big Daddy" is about to be moved.
GLYNN CONLEY
Medford, Mass.

BEST SET
Sirs:
You can't really be of the opinion that the trio of James, Vereb and Sutton forms "the best set in the East" (NFL Scouting Reports. Sept. 26). What with Sutton being given his release the day SPORTS ILLUSTRATED was on the newsstands, Vereb being a refugee from the Canadian League, and James being used to a great extent on defense in his tenure with the 'Skins, I question your observation.

You must have forgotten the likes of Barnes, Peaks and rookie Ted Dean of the Eagles; how about Gifford, Webster and King of the Giants; or maybe Mitchell, Renfro and Gautt of the Browns.
TUCKER W. RUMBERGER
Alexandria, Va.

ERRATIC BALLY ACHE
Sirs:
"Bally Ache has been as erratic as a hurricane's path" (SCORECARD, Sept. 26).

I may be wrong, but if memory serves me correctly, Bally Ache's record is as follows:

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