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A season for sophomores
Walter Bingham
October 31, 1960
From Washington to Florida the nation's football teams glitter with second-year men
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October 31, 1960

A Season For Sophomores

From Washington to Florida the nation's football teams glitter with second-year men

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There are plenty of good sophomore linemen around, too, although, like most linemen, they have not made the big headlines. Mississippi has a 238-pound sophomore tackle named Jim Dunaway, a quiet, diligent Baptist with a devout appetite. Dunaway's high school coach tells of the morning the two of them were driving to a game. Not long after breakfast, they stopped for coffee. As they were leaving, Dunaway asked the waitress for some pie. She started to get him a slice, and he said no, he meant the whole pie and he'd take it with him. A short mile and a half up the road the coach heard the empty aluminum piepan hit the highway.

Michigan State, too, has a boy who likes to eat. In prep school Dave Behrman weighed 285 pounds, but in college he was put on a diet. He now weighs a feathery 247. "He looks like a starved giant," says MSU Coach Duffy Daugherty. "I knew he could be our finest defensive lineman, and he hasn't let us down." Behrman displayed his awesome strength at the Pan American wrestling trials last summer, when he was just out of high school. Matched against an older, more experienced opponent, Behrman wrestled on even terms for seven minutes, then shocked the gallery by standing suddenly, lifting his opponent and slamming him to the mat.

There are many other fine sophomores around the land. Bobby Dodd Jr. of Florida was instrumental in beating Georgia Tech, where his father is head coach. Kansas' Bert Coan, a high school sprint champion, is tied for second in Big Eight scoring. An 18-year-old lineman from Ohio named Dave Meggysey has been one of the big reasons why Syracuse, otherwise disappointing, has been so rugged on defense.

These and the dozens of other top sophomores can look forward to two seasons more of college football glory, but they should lend an ear to the cautionary advice of Texas Christian Coach Abe Martin: "One of the big things coaches must watch for these days is the older player getting complacent, particularly if he's done well. He gets a little tired of college football. He's thinking about the pro offers and he wants to get married and all sorts of things. He still plays good ball, of course, because he has pride. But sometimes he won't give you the enthusiasm he would have a year earlier—that extra step or powder in a block."

In short, this year's sophomores must remember that they won their jobs because older players weren't good enough. Next year and the year after they'll be the older players, and there'll be new crops of sophomores eager to make the starting team.

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