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That slow Colt start
Ray Cave
November 07, 1960
Behind two straight Baltimore losses lies a story of injuries, errors and a curious attitude
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November 07, 1960

That Slow Colt Start

Behind two straight Baltimore losses lies a story of injuries, errors and a curious attitude

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"I do know that, over-all, this team is better than last year's," concluded Ewbank as the Colt plane dropped into the Dallas landing pattern, "but with two losses we've got a long way to go."

Against the Cowboys on Sunday the Colts looked like they might yet go a long way. Their victory, to be sure, was expected. But it was also impressive. Baltimore scored quickly, as it had not done since the Bears game. And it scored often and with great dexterity. Unitas, throwing softly once again, completed eight of 16, discreetly refused to pass when his receivers were covered and did not have a single interception or fumble. Berry, no longer lame, went deep with ease, catching three touchdown passes on plays covering 68, 52 and 70 yards. With Moore and Mutscheller both well, the Colts ran their best pass patterns of the year.

Colt Fullback Alan Ameche, one of the dawdling vets whom Ewbank wouldn't name, found himself benched for the first time in his six-year NFL career. His replacement, Billy Pricer, led a Colt running attack which gained 217 yards. The defense didn't let the Cowboys complete a pass in the first half or allow a score until a weird Colt kickoff sailed backward in a 25-mph Texas gale, landing on the Colt 28. The final was 45-7, and the Baltimore Colts—because they had to, of course—had won again.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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