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A roundup of the sports information of the week
December 05, 1960
BASEBALL—The AMERICAN LEAGUE temporarily shelved its plan for expanding into Walter O'Malley's Los Angeles territory, offered instead a compromise proposal calling for immediate expansion by both leagues to nine teams, with an interleague schedule next season that would have every AL team meet every NL team six times (for 54 games), as well as each club meeting the others in its own league 14 times (for 112 games). American League President Joe Cronin announced that if the National League accepted the proposal before the interleague meeting next week in St. Louis his league would drop its plans to move into California next season. Most National League sentiment, however, was against the proposal.
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December 05, 1960

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASEBALL—The AMERICAN LEAGUE temporarily shelved its plan for expanding into Walter O'Malley's Los Angeles territory, offered instead a compromise proposal calling for immediate expansion by both leagues to nine teams, with an interleague schedule next season that would have every AL team meet every NL team six times (for 54 games), as well as each club meeting the others in its own league 14 times (for 112 games). American League President Joe Cronin announced that if the National League accepted the proposal before the interleague meeting next week in St. Louis his league would drop its plans to move into California next season. Most National League sentiment, however, was against the proposal.

New Yankee General Manager Roy Hamey, in what he called a new Yankee policy aimed at full-scale bonus-baby competition with other clubs, signed HOWARD KITT, an 18-year-old Columbia University engineering student from Ocean-side, N.Y. The Yankees paid one of their largest bonuses ever, believed to be in the neighborhood of $65,000. Kitt had a high school pitching record of 40 victories and one defeat.

The Minneapolis-St. Paul major league team, recently shifted from Washington, will be known as the MINNESOTA TWINS.

BASKETBALL—BOSTON CELTICS moved into first place in the Eastern Division with a 122-105 victory over New York, increased their lead when they moved on to Philly and beat the Warriors 132-129. They finished the week with another victory over New York and one over Syracuse, to make it seven straight. ST. LOUIS held first place in the Western Division.

In the NIBL, the NEW YORK TUCK TAPERS took on dark horse status with a 2-2 record and a 102-95 victory over the Bartlesville Phillips 66ers, the defending champions. ADRIAN SMITH, former Olympian and guard for the Akron Good-years, leads the league in scoring with 83 points in three games.

BICYCLE RACING—TED SMITH of Buffalo, a 1948 Olympian, won the season-long U.S. Senior Men's all-round title by nine points over Bob Tetzlaff of the U.S. Army, a 1960 Olympian.

BOATING—LOWELL NORTH of Mission Bay, Calif. won the world Star-class sailing championship for the second straight year, at Rio de Janeiro. In five races, North had three firsts, a fifth and a ninth, for a total of 218 points. Runner-up: Don K. Elder of Newport Harbor, Calif. with 216.

BOWLING—DAVE SOUTAR of Detroit rolled 1,276 in five games to break the world record of 1,274 set last year, at Detroit.

Jim Hartley of Costa Mesa, Calif. claimed a U.S. marathon record after bowling 1,042 games in 183� hours. Hartley allowed himself an hour shower break every morning, a half-hour rest every two hours.

BOXING—DR. EDITH SUMMERSKILL of England, longtime opponent of boxing, author of The Ignoble Art, and Laborite Member of Parliament, announced she would introduce a bill banning the sport, after Fighter Bobby Neill, KO'd by Terry Spinks in the 14th round of a bout for the British featherweight title, underwent an emergency operation to remove a blood clot from the brain.

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