SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 03, 1961
MUTINYSirs:I don't know how long it has been since the U.S. Navy changed an admiral because a few seamen rocked the boat, but from last week's evidence it will be a long time before the Navy does it again. The mutineers' choice, Paul Quinn (Rousing Day for U.S. Rowing, June 19), and his formidable crew looked pretty poor in their sixth-place finish at Saturday's IRA compared to Lou Lindsey's 1960 Navy boat, which finished second and later won the Olympic trials. Whoever directs Naval Academy athletics should tell "soft-spoken faultfinder" Quinn to goad his men a little harder, or better yet just tell him to go. FRANK RYAN Iowa City, Iowa
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
July 03, 1961

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3

?See page 10.—ED.

Sirs:
Rex Cawley, not Young, is the brightest U.S. Olympic hope for the future.
PHIL GAROFALO
Hollywood

Sirs:
You picked a real winner when you wrote about Earl Young. Your article gives him credit he deserves and will live up to.
LAURENCE R. MANSUR
Tulsa

TIME TO AUTOMATE
Sirs:
When 4:15 was spectacular time for the mile, hand-timing may have been good enough. And tape measures may have sufficed to decide the high jump at six feet. The time has now come to turn to electronic recordings. When the hundred is run in 9.2 seconds the record should not have to depend upon the amount of flesh on the watch finger of each timer and the speed of his reactions. The electric eye could as satisfactorily record the exact height attained by a jumper or a vaulter rather than to limit the performance of the athlete to the measured height of the crossbar.

Further, in fairness to potential record breakers, major tracks should be allowed to reverse the direction of sprints and hurdle races to eliminate the frustration that accompanies having one's new record disallowed because of a following wind.
F. P. SHERRY
San Rafae Calif.

A.C—D.C.
Sirs:
The Americans have consistently (past six years) been beaten at the bridge table in international competition (Heavy Thought and Agony, May 1), yet U.S. tournament officials bar the very system of Italian bidding which has defeated them in four of the last five years. This would be like General Electric confidently building D.C. (direct current) generators when Nikola Tesla had already proved the fact that A.C. (alternating current) generators were more efficient, reliable and accurate. The Italians have proved beyond all question that the standard American bidding is inefficient, unreliable and inaccurate.
G. A. HOBBS
R. G. NETTLEBLAD
Denver

MASTER PUTTER
Sirs:
You say that " Billy Casper, 1959 U.S. Open champion, needs only to regain his putting touch to be a major contender" (A Real Monster of a Golf Course, June 12). But back in February you had a huge article on My Secrets of Putting by Bill Casper.

Explanation?
TED McNEILL
Palo Alto, Calif.

?When Billy Casper's putting is bad, it's pretty good; when it's good, it's terrific—ED.

ON TO OBSCURITY
Sirs:
The lead paragraph of the Cookie Lavagetto story in the May 15 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED reads as follows: "It is typical of Cookie Lavagetto that he should not want his story written. 'I prefer to remain in obscurity,' he says."

Continue Story
1 2 3