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A roundup of the sports information of the week
July 17, 1961
BOATING—Fuller Callaway's Morning Star was the first of the seven-boat field to finish the 3,571-mile race from California to Tahiti, less than three weeks after leaving Los Angeles. Handicap winner was ATHENE, out of San Francisco. John Hedden's Good News was second.
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July 17, 1961

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BOATING—Fuller Callaway's Morning Star was the first of the seven-boat field to finish the 3,571-mile race from California to Tahiti, less than three weeks after leaving Los Angeles. Handicap winner was ATHENE, out of San Francisco. John Hedden's Good News was second.

CHESS—With a display of formidable team power, RUSSIA treated opposition like pawns, won the European Championships at Oberhausen, Germany, with 74.5 points out of a possible 100. Far behind in second place, with 58.5 points, was Yugoslavia. Though Russian Grandmasters Mikhail Tal and Mikhail Botvinnik—who reclaimed his world championship over Tal this spring—were visibly tired, Botvinnik nonetheless won six out of a possible nine points, while Tal captured 5�. Most successful of the Russians were Victor Korchnoi, with 8� points, Vassily Smyslov, an ex-world champion, with 8, and Mark Taimanov with 7�.

GOLF—In an 18-hole, three-way playoff at the $50,000 Buick Open in Grand Blanc, Mich., JACK BURKE JR. defeated his two rivals, Billy Casper Jr. and Johnny Pott, with some deadly putting, including a 63-footer uphill for a birdie on the 11th. Burke finished with a 1-under-par 71. Casper and Pott each had indifferent 74s. It was Burke's first victory in two years.

Don January of Dallas shot an 8-under-par in the last 18 holes to overtake third-round leader Buster Cupit of Fort Smith, Ark. and win the $30,000 St. Paul Open with a 19-under-par 269. Cupit, a part-time tournament player, eagled the last hole for a second-place 270.

Paul Runyan, 52, of La Jolla, Calif. caught his British opponent Sam King, 50, in the world senior championship at Fairhaven, England on the 27th hole, where King blasted from one bunker to another for a 6, pulled ahead to win the 36-hole final 3 and 1.

HARNESS RACING—With dour Clint Hodgins in the sulky, ELAINE RODNEY took the first heat ($6.30) of the $14,500 Titan free-for-all trot at Historic Track in Goshen, N.Y. in 2:02[3/5], an hour later returned to win the second heat ($5.30) in an even faster 2:02, for a world record for her sex of 4:04[3/5] for two heats on a half-mile track. Old record was 4:05[1/5] by Proximity. For another Goshen record, see page 42.

Merrie Duke ($65) rallied from next to last in the $50,000 American Trotting Championship at Roosevelt to upset Su Mac Lad by � of a length and earn an invitation to join him in this week's International Trot (see page 44). The 4-year-old, driven by John Patterson, trotted the 1� miles in a fast 2:33[3/5]. With his usual winning form ADIOS BUTLER ($2.60) took his fifth straight, the $25,000 Little Pat Pace at Roosevelt, by 1� lengths over Mr. Budlong. Urged on by Eddie Cobb, the 5-year-old covered the 1[1/16] miles in 2:07[2/5].

HORSE RACING—GLOBEMASTER ($8.40) caught the Fourth Estate Stable's front-running Editorialist in the final strides to win the $108,900 Arlington Classic by a neck. Fred W. Hooper's Crozier finished third. The Leonard P. Sasso colt, who was second in the Preakness and the Belmont, carried top weight of 119 pounds, finished in 1:35[2/5] under John L. Rotz.

Four-and-twenty ($4.60), Alberta Ranches' temperamental 3-year-old, won his second straight Hollywood Park stakes, the $122,900 Hollywood Derby, by running the only way he knows—in front all the way—to beat We're Hoping by 3� lengths. A bad fall on the stretch turn marred the race. Mr. America snapped a bone in his leg and threw Jockey Eddie Burns inside the rail. Ronnie's Ace, with Pete Moreno up, crashed into the fallen horse and also went down. Neither jockey was hurt, but Mr. America had to be destroyed. Four-and-Twenty, with graybeard Johnny Longden in the saddle, ran the 1� miles in 2:00[3/5].

Seemingly oblivious of his 133-pound weight, heaviest of his career, Bohemia Stable's KELSO ($3.20) breezed home five lengths in front of Nickel Boy in the $111,900 Suburban Handicap at Aqueduct. It was Kelso's 10th victory in a row and his ninth under Eddie Arcaro. The 4-year-old gelding ran the 1� miles in a snappy 2:02, only four-fifths of a second off the Aqueduct record set last September by Sword Dancer, who carried only 126 pounds.

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