SI Vault
 
THE WAY TO BEAT A HEAVY THINKER
Roger Williams
August 28, 1961
You just smile and swim faster, according to Japan's Tsuyoshi Yamanaka, who got the better of Murray Rose in a most memorable competition
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
August 28, 1961

The Way To Beat A Heavy Thinker

You just smile and swim faster, according to Japan's Tsuyoshi Yamanaka, who got the better of Murray Rose in a most memorable competition

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2

Records may have been made to be broken, as baseball fans are fond of saying, but no one at Los Angeles could remember a single swimming meet in which new marks were set with such humdrum regularity. In the first seven races six world records were established. The eighth race—the 200-meter individual medley, won by Ted Stickles in 2:15.9—will not be a world mark only because the International Amateur Swimming Federation does not recognize the event. The incredible breaststroker, Indiana University's Chet Jastremski, cut 6.9 full seconds off the 200-meter record in a race that left spectators rubbing their eyes; five of the six finishers topped the world record. For Jastremski, it marked the seventh consecutive time he had bettered an established world breaststroke mark. For good measure, he lopped four seconds off the 100-meter breaststroke record the next day. The 18-year-old Steve Clark, national indoor 100- and 220-yard champion, barely qualified for the 100-meter finals, then ripped off a world record of 54.4. Left gasping in fourth place was Brazil's great Manuel Dos Santos, who had upset Clark recently in Japan. Carl Robie, a 16-year-old peanut-sized swimmer from Drexel Hill, Pa., set a world record in the 200-meter butterfly; the former record holder, Mike Troy of Indianapolis, had to settle for an ignominious fifth. In all, 10 world and three American records were chalked up in the most memorable swimming competition in American history.

1 2