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CASE OF THE DEADLY DEAN
Kenneth Rudeen
September 11, 1961
Trotting's foremost event had a shocker of an ending as Harlan Dean murdered the opposition and set a world record in the 36th Hambletonian
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September 11, 1961

Case Of The Deadly Dean

Trotting's foremost event had a shocker of an ending as Harlan Dean murdered the opposition and set a world record in the 36th Hambletonian

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Meanwhile, at the Hanover Shoe Farms, Hanover, Pa., the most important trotting nursery in the world, a filly foal by the world champion Hanover trotter, Dean Hanover, was born sightless in one eye and with a defective leg ("She didn't stand good," a Hanover man explains.) Fearful that she might transmit infirmities to her offspring, Hanover sold her as a yearling to a Maryland horseman for $100. Her name was Lydean Hanover.

Hempt heard of this transaction and promptly bought her for himself, paying $350. He was enthralled with her bloodlines and willing to risk what amounted to a fairly modest gamble. Soon Lydean was totally blind, but Hempt bred her to Harlan. The result: Harlan Dean. Hempt sold him as a yearling to Del Miller and Pennsylvania's Roy Cleveland, a road contractor, for only $5,500 but began to like his looks so much that he bought back a one-third interest.

Harlan Dean was actually far from sound when he started racing. But even so he managed to win seven of 20 starts as a 2-year-old, earn $41,748 and emerge from the season as a prospect for the Hambletonian. Then he developed sore legs again early this year, and seemed to be a ho-hum horse.

Jimmy Arthur showed there was nothing ho-hum about him last week, however, nor was there anything else dull about the 36th Hambletonian. The Hayes boys were delighted by the race and relieved the next day when The Hambletonian Society board of directors extended Du Quoin's contract to hold the event for another year—through 1963.

But the happiest man of all was foxy Max Hempt, who had picked the winner all the way. "The blood's there," he exulted, waving a hand toward Harlan Dean as the new champion was being cooled out. "It will always pop out. And it popped right here."

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