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THE WEST
Mervin Hyman
September 18, 1961
Marshall Shirk, UCLA's aggressive tackle, likes few things better than a rough ball game. He and hundreds of other players, most of them Californians, are reason enough why West Coast football should be better than it has been in years
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September 18, 1961

The West

Marshall Shirk, UCLA's aggressive tackle, likes few things better than a rough ball game. He and hundreds of other players, most of them Californians, are reason enough why West Coast football should be better than it has been in years

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Clearly, it is this kind of discipline, along with Sequoia-sized linemen like Marshall Shirk, that has given UCLA renewed hope for more successes of the Red Sanders variety.

Not all of the California prospects, of course, see football as a series of thunderous crashes. Hugh Campbell, who is from Saratoga, lives to catch passes. Last year at Washington State, where they have an almost wild compulsion to throw the ball, sophomore Campbell got his big, sure hands on 66 of them and gained 881 yards, thereby breaking assorted NCAA records. Offensively, with Pat Richter of Wisconsin, he is one of the two best ends in college today.

One of the best runners is a squat, smallish halfback named Tommy Larscheid who was lured from California to Utah State. Skyline Conference defensemen sadly gave him 1,044 yards from scrimmage last year, a total placing Larscheid second in the nation.

Deep and dependable though the California talent is, the best all-round back now operating in the West is an Oregonian. Terry Baker, while a three-sport all-state champion at Portland's Jefferson High, once took a notion that he would never play football at Oregon State. However, the Beavers' coach, Tommy Prothro, is notional, too, and he liked the looks of the temperamental Terry. At Prothro's urging, Baker changed his mind, last year broke State's alltime record for total offense in two different games and, all in all, accounted for a smashing 1,473 yards with his looping left-handed passes and graceful dashes as a single-wing tailback.

Everything considered, the quality of western football should be the highest in years. There is even talk of burying a few hatchets, which in the West are usually fine-honed. Some say the present Big Five—Washington, USC, UCLA, California and Stanford—will officially be rejoined before long by the schools they rudely shouldered aside when the old PCC broke up, namely, Oregon, Oregon State and Washington State.

End of the Skyline

In the Mountain States, the Skyline Conference is playing its last year as a normal league. Denver has dropped football, and the bigger schools, Wyoming, Utah, Brigham Young and New Mexico, are to join Arizona and Arizona State in a new and surprisingly strong conference. This leaves smaller Utah State, Colorado State and Montana to fend for themselves.

All this is something of a bore to Californians, who feel that the western football world logically revolves on the USC- UCLA axis. Now that normality reigns once again, they may be right.

AIR FORCE

The Falcons lost both their wings when Rich Mayo, the slingshot passer who fired for 1,168 yards last year, and Mike Quinlan, who ran for 585 more, picked up their commissions in June. Finding replacements for his flexible wing T is Coach Ben Martin's major worry. Husky sophomore Quarterback Joe Rodwell, who has mastered the rollout, will battle Jerry Thies for Mayo's position, and sophomore Terry Isaacson, a fine running quarterback who has been moved to halfback, should win Quinlan's place. If they fail, the offensive burden will rest with workhorse Halfback Don Baucom, who does everything well, and Fullback Nick Arshinkoff. The line will be in trouble if anything happens to Center E. C. Newman, a 215-pound linebacker, Guard Ken Needham, Tackle Bruce Kohl or Ends Carl ton Simpson and Dick Brown.

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