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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
September 25, 1961
COURT ORDERSirs:I don't know anything about the USLTA, but I do know this guy Dennis Ralston is a spoiled brat (SCORECARD, Sept. 11). I've seen him on many occasions pull some baby act that made him top candidate for a punch in the nose.
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September 25, 1961

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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GUNNING FOOLS
Sirs:
Being somewhat of a duck hunter (or "gunner," as they say on the Eastern Shore of Maryland), I must say that I am not shocked at the new limit restrictions (Good for Deer, Bad for Ducks, Sept. 11). However, I doubt if Secretary of the Interior Udall (SCORECARD, Aug. 28) has ever enjoyed the thrill when wild ducks wheel and start to swing over the decoys. If he had, he would know only too well that it takes a special breed of happy fool to enjoy the sport.

It is my feeling that this special breed would much prefer a closed season to allow the duck population a full year of vacation. I also feel that he (the foolish duck hunter) would be willing to buy his Federal Duck Stamp even if he can't use it, because he knows that the money is spent to try and give him better hunting.
H. A. KARR JR.
Chevy Chase, Md.

PROPHET WITH HONOR
Sirs:
Remember my telling you that Army Lieutenant Jay Silvester might become the first man to throw the discus over 200 feet (19TH HOLE, Aug. 7)? Well, he's done it, reaching a tremendous 210 feet 2 inches in Los Angeles on September 9.

After reaching 190 feet for the first time only a year ago, Silvester broke the 60-meter barrier on August 11 in Frankfurt by setting a world record of 60.56 meters (198 feet 8� inches). He increased that record a short time later and now has made the big breakthrough by throwing 10 feet over the 200 mark.
STEPHEN GOULD
Cheverly, Md.

? SPORTS ILLUSTRATED salutes a well-called shot.—ED.

ALEX TO ZAMP
Sirs:
Your PAT ON THE BACK (Aug. 28) for Lou Zamperini and his notable success with introducing delinquent boys to Mammoth Mountain sports and the outdoors brings to mind the silent part played in his program by the much-maligned squire of Squaw Valley, Alex Cushing. Lou recently confided to me that for several summers the oft-damned Olympic mover has turned his luxurious lodge and its facilities over to him and his young charges.

Cushing personally sees to it that they are treated as the guests they are, with mammoth meals, swimming, ice skating, horseback riding and the use of the chair lifts. All on the q.t., with no thought of thanks from anyone save Zamp and his boys.

For this, Alex Cushing gets our personal pat on the back.
ELMAR BAXTER
Los Angeles

Sirs:
Lou Zamperini has made a career of battling the odds and winning. He was a top-notch miler for the University of Southern California in the late '30s and came from behind to win many a race.

As a bombardier during World War II, he was shot down during a mission, drifted for 47 days on the open sea and was finally captured and imprisoned for 28 torturous months by the Japanese.
RICHARD D. GROO
Newark, Del.

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