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Get Strong
Gilbert Rogin
October 30, 1961
From California to New York, housewives, athletes and businessmen are taking up a no-sweat, no-pain system of muscle building
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October 30, 1961

Get Strong

From California to New York, housewives, athletes and businessmen are taking up a no-sweat, no-pain system of muscle building

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Karpovich does recognize IC as a valuable system for rehabilitating the handicapped. Indeed, it has been used to maintain and rebuild the strength of hospitalized and convalescent patients. Dr. W. T. Liberson, in a controlled study at a veterans' hospital in Rocky Hill, Conn., reported strength increases of up to 300%.

Wesley K. Ruff, associate professor of physical education at Stanford, takes a middle-of-the-road approach. IC, he says, can be helpful to the person without room or facilities for exercise (e.g., space travelers, long-distance drivers, deskbound office workers). It can improve all-around fitness, provided it is used along with exercises like running, which build up the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. And it can be helpful to people who have all the natural skills of their favorite sport but lack the needed strength. Not a complete answer, IC then must take its place among the more conventional forms of exercise, a valuable supplement but not a substitute. GIs and ex-GIs will be sorry to hear that calisthenics will be around for a few more years.

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