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A roundup of the sports information of the week
October 30, 1961
BASEBALL—NEW YORK YANKEES placed four men on the major league All-Star team: Outfielders Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris, Catcher Elston Howard, and Shortstop Tony Kubek, but 25-game-winner Whitey Ford lost out in the voting for a left-handed pitcher to the National League's regular 20-game winner, Warren Spahn. First Baseman Norm Cash of Detoit, Second Baseman Frank Boiling of Milwaukee and Third Baseman Ken Boyer of St. Louis round out the infield while two players from the pennant-winning Cincinnati Reds, Outfielder Frank Robinson and right-handed Pitcher Joey Jay, complete the first team.
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October 30, 1961

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASEBALL—NEW YORK YANKEES placed four men on the major league All-Star team: Outfielders Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris, Catcher Elston Howard, and Shortstop Tony Kubek, but 25-game-winner Whitey Ford lost out in the voting for a left-handed pitcher to the National League's regular 20-game winner, Warren Spahn. First Baseman Norm Cash of Detoit, Second Baseman Frank Boiling of Milwaukee and Third Baseman Ken Boyer of St. Louis round out the infield while two players from the pennant-winning Cincinnati Reds, Outfielder Frank Robinson and right-handed Pitcher Joey Jay, complete the first team.

PRO BASKETBALL—After the first week Boston and Syracuse were 1-0 and tied for the Eastern Division lead, followed by Philadelphia, 2-1, and New York, as usual, last at 1-1. In the Western Division, Cincinnati led with 1-0, Los Angeles was 1-1, St. Louis and Detroit were tied at 0-1 and the new team in the league, Chicago, was last with 0-2.

BICYCLE RACING—VITO TACCONE of Italy, pedaling against a strong international field, won the 157-mile Tour of Lombardy, closing event of the Italian international cycling season. Taccone averaged 22 mph over the hilly course from Milan to Como.

BOXING—SUGAR RAY ROBINSON, looking for yet another title fight, failed to impress either spectators or his 22-year-old opponent, Dennis Moyer, but still managed to win a unanimous 10-round decision, in Madison Square Garden, New York. EDDIE MACHEN, third-ranked heavyweight, gave former British champion Brian London reason to reconsider his comeback, thumped him soundly with body punches, then cut his right eye and nose with sharp combinations, to win a fifth-round TKO, in London's Wembley Stadium.

CROSS-COUNTRY—WESTERN MICHIGAN, though its runners placed no higher than third, won the Notre Dame Invitational Meet, in South Bend. Frank Carver of Notre Dame was first in 19:32.5, several seconds ahead of Les Hegedus of Indiana Central State, but Western Michigan won the next four places and finished 59 points in front of second-place Ohio University in the team standings. Slippery Rock was third, one point behind O.U.

FOOTBALL—PROCTOR ACADEMY of Andover, N.H. defeated Westmount High School of Montreal, Canada 20-17, in the 12th resumption of this unique international competiton, in Montreal. The U.S. prep school, behind 9-6 at the end of the first half, in which Canadian football rules were used, came back in the second half when the more familiar U.S. rules were in play to score twice—once on a five-yard sweep by Fullback Jack Woods, the other on a 12-yard pass from Tom Jones to Paul Lile.

GOLF—ROBERT BELL, 56-year-old former Ohio State football player, carded a 78 to win the North and South Senior Golf Tournament, I up over John Mercer, in Pinehurst, N.C. Bell won the first five of his six matches the hard way, either in extra holes or on the 18th hole.

HARNESS RACING—ADIOS BUTLER, so heavily favored that the crowd of 16,352 was prohibited from betting on him, gained, lost and finally regained and held the lead in the backstretch to win the first leg of the $80,000 American Pacing Classic in a driving finish at Hollywood Park, Inglewood, Calif. With Eddie Cobb in the sulky, the 5-year-old pacing champion covered the mile in 1:57[3/5] to finish ahead of Caduceus, who in an unusual arrangement paid $11.40, $3.60 and $3.20 as the "winner." SPRITE RODNEY ($4.10), only filly in the field of 10 trotters, made the top early in the $85,135 West-bury Futurity Trot, richest for 2-year-olds, won easily by two lengths over A.C.'s Viking at Roosevelt Raceway, Westbury, N.Y. The winner, owned by Mrs. Mary Jenney and driven by Frank Ervin, raced the mile in 2:04[3/5], broke Roosevelt's record for 2-year-olds set the day before by Worth Seein'.

HOCKEY—NEW YORK (4-3-1) missed Goalie Gump Worsley, out with a concussion, dropped into a tie with MONTREAL (4-0-1) for the lead with 9 points. TORONTO (3-1-1) and DETROIT (2-1-3) followed with 7 points. CHICAGO (1-2-3) had 5 points, and BOSTON (0-7-1) was last with 1 point, after second week of play.

HORSE RACING—CICADA ($4), owned and bred by Christopher T. Chenery, undisturbed by a drizzle and sloppy track, finished 10 lengths ahead of Narola in the $161,885 Gardenia Stakes at Garden State Park, N.J. The 2-year-old filly, winner of her last six stakes races, carried Willie Shoemaker to a Gardenia record of 1:44 4/5 for the 1 1/16 miles, increased her earnings to $384,676.

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