SI Vault
 
Don't Pull up for Doc
Gerald Holland
November 13, 1961
Dr. Raworth Williams is a 66-year-old surgeon who three years ago captained the Dallas Athletic Club to a national polo championship. Doc still plays a fast, hard game, and says he'll quit the day younger players start easing up on him
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 13, 1961

Don't Pull Up For Doc

Dr. Raworth Williams is a 66-year-old surgeon who three years ago captained the Dallas Athletic Club to a national polo championship. Doc still plays a fast, hard game, and says he'll quit the day younger players start easing up on him

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

The doctor's eyes flashed, and he seemed to blanch under his tan.

"Nobody pulls up for me," he snapped. "And I don't pull up for anybody else. The day they start pulling up for Doc Williams, that's the day I quit—and quit for good."

He nodded his head vigorously and slipped out of his white coat. He started back to the examining rooms. "I'll be with you in a minute," he said. "We'll get on out to the farm and look at some horses."

A little later Dr. Williams, wearing a broad-brimmed Stetson, was behind the wheel of his air-conditioned Cadillac, holding the speedometer needle at an even 70. He was pointed for his 100-acre farm, which is about 12 miles northwest of Dallas.

"We were speaking," he said, "of the Dallas Athletic Club winning the National Open in 1958. You must remember that another Dallas team, the Circle F, captained by Russell Firestone Jr., won the Open the following year and took the National 20-goal championship as well."

"Isn't it true, doctor, that polo is enjoying a modest sort of renaissance throughout the country?"

"Yes, and particularly in Florida and the Middle West. A magazine had quite a write-up this past summer on what Robert Uihlein and his associates have done to popularize the game in Milwaukee."

"I read that write-up," I said. "I was surprised to see that the polo games played at Mr. Uihlein's farm drew crowds as large as 3,000 regularly."

Dr. Williams laughed shortly.

"That's very encouraging, of course," he said, "but I can remember when the East-West and International games played at the Meadow Brook club on Long Island, New York would draw 30, 000 spectators—and turn people away Those were the golden days of polo, the late 1920s and most of the 1930s. Those were the days of Tommy Hitchcock, Mike Phipps, Stewart Iglehart and the other of that caliber—Cecil Smith, a 10-goaler then and a 10-goaler today at the age of 58. Why, they used to field 30-and even 40-goal teams. When we won the National Open we had a team handicap of 26."

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Related Topics
  ARTICLES GALLERIES COVERS
Doc Williams 1 0 0
Raworth Williams 2 0 0
Dallas 726 0 11
Tulsa 190 0 0
George Sherman 0 0 0