SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
November 13, 1961
BASEBALL—The YOMIURI GIANTS of Tokyo squeezed home a run in the 10th inning on three singles and a sacrifice bunt to defeat the Nankai Hawks of Osaka 3-2, and win the Japanese World Series 4 games to 2, at Osaka, Japan. Joe Stanka, the losing pitcher, a 30-year-old Oklahoman who played briefly for the Chicago White Sox, appeared in five of the six games for the Hawks, winning 2 and losing 2, received the Fighting Spirit Award, a motorcycle. Another American, Andy Miyamoto of Hawaii, the Giants' winning pitcher in the second and third games, was chosen the most valuable player.
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November 13, 1961

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASEBALL—The YOMIURI GIANTS of Tokyo squeezed home a run in the 10th inning on three singles and a sacrifice bunt to defeat the Nankai Hawks of Osaka 3-2, and win the Japanese World Series 4 games to 2, at Osaka, Japan. Joe Stanka, the losing pitcher, a 30-year-old Oklahoman who played briefly for the Chicago White Sox, appeared in five of the six games for the Hawks, winning 2 and losing 2, received the Fighting Spirit Award, a motorcycle. Another American, Andy Miyamoto of Hawaii, the Giants' winning pitcher in the second and third games, was chosen the most valuable player.

BASKETBALL—BOSTON CELTICS (4-0), without a player listed among the NBA's top 10 scorers, made the most of their matchless balance, won 2 games to continue to lead the East. PHILADELPHIA (4-3) split 2 games but moved ahead of NEW YORK (4-5) which lost 3, won 1. SYRACUSE (3-5) lost 2, won 1, remained last. LOS ANGELES (7-2) began to look like a solid Western leader, won 2 and lost 1. ST. LOUIS (4-4), making do with a patched-up backcourt, kept pace with the same record. CINCINNATI (3-4) lost 2, won 1, managed to stay ahead of surprising CHICAGO (2-4), which split two games. DETROIT (1-5) won its first game but also lost 1, was in last place.

BOATING—LAKE WASHINGTON ROWING CLUB of Seattle, stroking smoothly, pulled ahead after 200 meters, then held the lead to win the four-oars-without-coxswain event in the U.S.- Japan goodwill regatta, at Toda, Japan. The winning crew: Ted Nash, William Flint Jr., Charles Holtz and Jay Hall pulled the 2,000-meter Olympic course in 7:6 to finish� of a length in front of Keio University, the closest of three strong Japanese crews.

BOWLING—DALLAS, the Eastern leader, swept a three-game series with New York to stay 1� games ahead of Detroit. In the West the race was tight, with Fort Worth moving from third to first after winning one game.

BOXING—BRITAIN'S amateur boxing team blitzed a U.S. team that included five AAU champions 10-0, at Wembley Pool, London, England (see page 60). The Americans, beginning a European tour, lost six matches by knockouts and two decisions on penalty points for butting.

John Caldwell, Belfast bantamweight, piled up points with a flicking left jab, but left a capacity crowd of 10,000 unimpressed with his 15-round decision over Alphonse Halimi, former world champion, at Wembley, England. Undefeated in 25 fights, Caldwell will next meet Brazil's Eder Jofre to clear up the dispute for the bantamweight title.

Emile Griffith, in his first fight since losing the welterweight title to Benny Paret, knocked out Stanford Bulla in the fourth round of a scheduled 10-round fight at Hamilton, Bermuda.

Von Clay, Philadelphia light heavyweight, a last-minute substitute, knocked down Heavyweight Billy Hunter in the second, fourth, sixth and eighth rounds before the referee stopped the fight, at Los Angeles. Von Clay, 12 pounds lighter than Hunter, took the fight after Alejandro Lavorante suffered a badly cut lip in training and was forced to withdraw.

Jose Torres, undefeated New York middleweight, won his 23rd fight by knocking out George Price, Texas light heavyweight, in the second round of a scheduled 10-round bout at Houston.

FOOTBALL—CHOATE SCHOOL of Wallingford, Conn. ended the three-year 26-game unbeaten string of Lawrenceville School of Lawrenceville, N.J., winning 18-7, at Wallingford, Conn. Bruce Molloy, a former all-Connecticut back, scored all three touchdowns for Choate.

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