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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 27, 1961
SHOESTRING BOXSirs:You head your story "The Night 10 Americans Got Clobbered"(Nov. 13)! What a misnomer. This was the night America itself got clobbered and not by the British alone.
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November 27, 1961

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
Pity the poor intellectual.
JAMES FORSYTH JR.
Upper Darby, Pa.

Sirs:
I saw the Massillon Tigers play some years ago, and after seeing hundreds of other high school football games in Kentucky, Ohio and here in Maryland, I just can't seem to find a team that is in the same class with Massillon.
LEWIS R. CANTWELL
Silver Spring, Md.

Sirs:
At least they emphasize winning in a wholesome sport.
D. A. PETERSON
Elkhart, Ind.

GOAL TO GO
Sirs:
Your story on football at Washington and Lee (A Sport for Gentlemen, Nov. 6) is like a clean, fresh breeze blowing in on an all-night crap game.

At Washington and Lee, football is what it was intended to be: a game, played for fun. They didn't come around to this conception because they couldn't win on the Big Apple. They came around to this because this is the right way to do it.
FANNING M. HEARON
Tryon, N.C.

Sirs:
You neglected to point out that Coach McLaughlin had produced winning football teams for a dozen years at Episcopal High (prep) School in Alexandria, Va. EHS is one of the leading boys' preparatory schools in America—a no-nonsense school that puts its emphasis on the academic drill, not on the athletic field. Nevertheless, its present team is probably the strongest in the U.S. today and boasts in Max Chapman one of the very finest schoolboy halfbacks. It was Coach Mac who developed the system of "football for all" at the high school, with teams for boys of every weight and age. Hats off to Washington and Lee, Lee McLaughlin and the high school at which a gentleman was allowed to develop his talents as a coach and his natural instinct for being a gentleman!
ROBERT K. CRAIG
Alexandria, Va.

Sirs:
You quote a W&L professor as saying, "The students were embarrassed to have schools like Hampden-Sydney as opponents," but you don't note that little Hampden-Sydney (470 students) is W&L's biggest rival (W&L has 1,540 students). We do not give football scholarships either, and our academic rating is as good as or better than theirs. We started playing them in 1955, and out of seven games we have won five, amassing 116 points to their 52 points Maybe they shouldn't be so ashamed after all.
ROBERT H. BENNETT
Hampden-Sydney, Va.

Sirs:
You say that in 1955 there was great pressure to return to big-time football. You said campus polls favored it. As author of this poll and sports editor of the college newspaper at the time, I would like to correct this statement.

We were not interested in returning to big-time football. What we suggested was that amateur athletics be retained but that a more active interest be taken by the university and the board of trustees. We emphasized the need for recruiting on an amateur basis among prep schools and high schools to attract good football players who were capable of holding their own academically.

The results of our poll indicated that 88% of the student body and faculty favored this action. With the hiring of Lee McLaughlin in 1956, the university actually embarked on a program similar to that suggested by the results of the poll.

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