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GOREN'S YEAR-END QUIZ
Charles Goren
December 25, 1961
On some bridge hands there may seem to be little to choose between one bid or another, and I grant your right to an opinion that does not precisely coincide with the range of scores I am about to propose. Nevertheless, the actual score you achieve on this quiz will have considerable significance. The aim of good bidding is to win points, and these questions set up the same target. You will gain points for any reasonable answer to each of the 18 problems. No matter what your bid is, no points are deducted from your score. Don't let this fool you. Choosing less than the best bid causes the same invisible losses that you suffer at the table by reaching less than the best contract. Score 90 and you'll be my favorite partner. With 80 you'll be a winning player. With 70 you'll still incur no severe loss on the year's play. But if you score 60 or less, the points you've lost on this quiz will be hugely multiplied at the table.
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December 25, 1961

Goren's Year-end Quiz

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1 CLUB—5 PTS.
1 SPADE—3 PTS.
1 NO TRUMP—2 PTS.

Though this hand possesses the textbook point requirements, a one-no-trump opening should be avoided when values are concentrated in two suits. A one-spade opening may present rebid problems. Assuming partner responds in a red suit to the club opening, your one-spade rebid lets him bid no trump if he can stop the fourth suit.

2

PASS—5 PTS.
3 NO TRUMP—2 PTS.
4 DIAMONDS—1 PT.

Partner's jump rebid in spades is not forcing, and you have about the least the law will tolerate for a one-no-trump response. If this hand could produce a game, partner should have been able to bid it himself.

3

4 DIAMONDS—5 PTS.
6 SPADES—4 PTS.
5 SPADES—3 PTS.
4 SPADES—1 PT.

This hand has suddenly grown to slam proportions. Although a direct leap to six spades would not be unreasonable, the wisest course would be a bid of four diamonds, followed by an overbid of game in spades.

4

PASS—5 PTS.
2 DIAMONDS—2 PTS.
2 NO TRUMP—1 PT.

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