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BIRDIES, BABIES AND LADIES
Alfred Wright
February 12, 1962
For many of golf's touring professionals, the circuit is a family affair where it's harder to change baby's diapers than to break par
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February 12, 1962

Birdies, Babies And Ladies

For many of golf's touring professionals, the circuit is a family affair where it's harder to change baby's diapers than to break par

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If a wife wants to "walk" with her husband and can't arrange with another wife to watch her children that day, she hires a baby sitter. "Most places are very good about baby sitters," Susan Marr reports. "They have a list of sitters who are always available, and they stand behind them. You hardly ever have any trouble that way.

"Conni Venturi, Joan Sanders, Shirley Casper and Winnie Palmer walk more than the rest of us," Susan went on. "But, then, they can afford baby sitters a little better than most of us. And don't forget, when your husband earns as much as theirs do, you're not so nervous every time he makes a shot."

When the husbands arrive home after a round of tournament play, most wives can tell at a glance how well they've done. "They don't talk golf too much," says Maryrose Pott. "Maybe for about 15 minutes they'll tell you what happened, but they don't replay the round for you. They don't talk nearly as much about their golf as amateurs do. Of course, if they've had a really bad round, they may not want to talk at all."

"Except for Mason Rudolph," put in Susan Marr. "He'll come in the room and say, 'I shot an 81 today' and laugh his head off."

After dinner, which more often than not is cooked in the motel room, either television or bridge is the staple entertainment. "The children don't seem to mind the noise a bit," says Susan Marr. "In fact, I think they get so used to us they sleep better on the road than at home."

"We're so close to our husbands," adds Maryrose Pott, "living with them day after day and week after week in motel rooms, that we're really lost when we're away from them. Vivienne Player really dies when she's away from Gary."

"There must be something to this life," Susan Marr says. "Look how our bachelor group gets smaller and smaller. Tony Lema and Jim Ferree are about the only ones left."

Sally Jacobs, Tommy's wife, summed it up with a note of defiance in her voice. "I'm proud of being a professional's wife," she said. "I like the life, and I'm proud of my husband. I wouldn't have it any other way."

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