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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
February 19, 1962
WIND IN THE OPENSirs: Bill Talbert has designed five exceptionally intelligent and concrete proposals for the growth of American tennis (Open Letter to the USLTA, Feb. 5).
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February 19, 1962

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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WIND IN THE OPEN
Sirs:
Bill Talbert has designed five exceptionally intelligent and concrete proposals for the growth of American tennis (Open Letter to the USLTA, Feb. 5).

As an enthusiastic spectator and as a junior participant, I especially agree with three of his major propositions: that top tennis ability should receive encouragement, that experienced tournament players should be included in the governing body of American tennis and that the best talent available, regardless of either professional or amateur status, should represent this nation and other participating countries in the Davis Cup competition. Talbert's fine propositions should be employed as part of a master plan to meet the crisis.
JOHN A. MACKENZIE
Fresh Meadows, N.Y.

Sirs:
It may be of interest to note that precisely one year ago I wrote the president of the USLTA a personal and confidential letter expressing much the same recommendations. It is indeed very gratifying to me that a publication of your prestige shares my views.

The whole USLTA meeting (SCORECARD, Feb. 12) could be accurately reported in just four words: "Big wind; no rain." Subsequent events will prove or disprove my analysis.

However, I have one other opinion to express. Let those who would criticize or attempt to rectify the situation within the USLTA as it now exists do so with no personal ax to grind but only with a sincere desire to promote the game.
FREDERICK R. SCHROEDER JR.
La Jolla, Calif.

SQUIRMY AND SALTY
Sirs:
Gilbert Rogin's Fish and Mugwumps (Feb. 5) was so squirmy it made the sole I was about to eat jump right onto the page.
LEE C. BRIGHT
Dayton

Sirs:
Hats off to Captain Gifford! Reading of the high regard he holds for the life of our magnificent salt-water gamefish should warm the heart of anyone who truly loves fish and fishing.
ROBERT NASH
East Palestine, Ohio

IRONY
Sirs:
In dealing with the tragic passing of the Southern Association of Baseball Clubs (SCORECARD, Feb. 5), you stated that "major league clubs just cannot afford affiliations with minor clubs that reject Negro players." That statement, in itself, is true. The implication, however—that Southern Association clubs reject Negro players—is in error.

For 61 years the Southern Association operated—and for the most part flourished—under segregation. In recent years there was no other choice because of state and local laws governing conditions in some of our member cities. This was never a league rule about the matter.

Before the end of the 1961 season, when a federal court pronounced most of those laws unconstitutional, the clubs themselves individually took immediate action, and every major league club was informed that henceforth Southern Association clubs would accept Negro players.

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