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A roundup of the sports information of the week
March 26, 1962
BASKETBALL—NBA: PHILADELPHIA defeated Syracuse 110-103 and 97-82 to take two games in the best-of-five Eastern Division playoffs and needed only one more win to go against Boston in the finals. Wilt Chamberlain became the first player in league history to go over the 4,000-point mark, and his record 4,029 also gave him the individual scoring title for the third straight year. DETROIT defeated Cincinnati twice (123-122 and 118-107) and lost to the Royals once (129-107) to lead in the Western Division playoffs.
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March 26, 1962

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASKETBALL—NBA: PHILADELPHIA defeated Syracuse 110-103 and 97-82 to take two games in the best-of-five Eastern Division playoffs and needed only one more win to go against Boston in the finals. Wilt Chamberlain became the first player in league history to go over the 4,000-point mark, and his record 4,029 also gave him the individual scoring title for the third straight year. DETROIT defeated Cincinnati twice (123-122 and 118-107) and lost to the Royals once (129-107) to lead in the Western Division playoffs.

BOATING—FRED MILLER of Newport Beach, Calif, sailed his Finn dinghy to only one victory in the seven-race North American championships at Nassau, but still retained his title with two seconds and three thirds for a total of 5,629 points, way ahead of some fine competition.

DOG SHOWS—CH. EDWARD'S REDDY CAREER, an orange Pomeranian owned by Mary S. Brewster of Millerton, N.Y., took two best-in-show honors in one weekend—at the Harrisburg (Pa.) Kennel Club and the National Capital Kennel Club in Washington, D.C. It was the third ribbon this month for Anne Hone Rogers, who was the handler for the three-pound, 21-month-old Pom.

FENCING—COLUMBIA tied New York University for the three-weapon Intercollegiate Fencing Association championship in New York, each with 59 points. It was the first tie since 1930. and the first time in four years that NYU hasn't taken undisputed honors. Columbia's No. 3 saber man, Jacob Bloom, held out against Midshipman Dale Windham for a 5-3 victory in the last event on the 270-bout program, and that boosted Columbia to the tie.

FIGURE SKATING—DONALD JACKSON of Canada uncorked a triple Lutz, first ever in international competition, to steal the men's world title away from Czechoslovakia's Karol Div�n, who was leading by nearly 46 points going into the free-skating part of the Prague championships. Jackson's brilliant performance, which left the judges gasping, gave him a 21.2-point victory over Div�n.

Sjoukje Dijkstra, the blonde Dutch girl who won the European women's title earlier this month, put on another almost flawless routine to take her first world title and end a six-year U.S. dominance of the event. Best American, Mrs. Barbara Ann Roles Pursley of Arcadia, Calif., finished fifth. OTTO and MARIA JELINEK of Canada won the pairs title and promptly quit competitive skating.

HOCKEY—NHL: MONTREAL beat New York 2-0 to take their fifth consecutive league title, but New York and Detroit continued to battle for the fourth playoff spot. After losing to New York 3-2, Detroit moved listlessly through a game with Boston, giving the Bruins their first win (4-0) in six weeks, but then defeated Chicago 4-1 to stay one point behind the Rangers, who tied Toronto 2-2 to stay in fourth.

College: MICHIGAN TECH kept the NCAA title in the West for the eighth straight season by beating the best from the East, Clarkson Tech, 7-1 at Utica, N.Y. Earlier, Michigan Tech had defeated St. Lawrence 6-1 to put that team in fourth and last place. Michigan came in third, having lost to Clarkson 5-4.

Amateur: SWEDEN hustled by Canada 5-3 and the U.S. 2-1 to become a surprise Class A team champion at the Denver and Colorado Springs world championships. Then dethroned Canada sent the U.S. team into third place with a 6-1 defeat (but a better finish for the U.S. than last year's sixth place). In Class B, Japan swept by France, Australia, Austria, The Netherlands and finally Denmark (13-1) to emerge as the tournament's real dark-horse winner.

HORSE RACING—JAY FOX ($44.80), with Larry Gilligan up, was declared winner of the $112,800 Gulfstream Park Handicap at Hallandale, Fla. when stewards dropped first finisher, Yorky, to second on a foul. The Brae Burn Farm's four-year-old ran the 1� miles in 2:01 3/5 for the $72,800 purse, his biggest yet.

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