SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
April 16, 1962
BADMINTON—FERDINAND SONNEVILLE, a 31-year-old economics student from Indonesia and a Dutch citizen, defeated Tan Joe Hok of Indonesia, rated best player in the world, 17-15, 18-17, in a tense final match in the national championships at Indiantown Gap, Pa. MRS. JUDY DEVLIN HASHMAN, a native of Baltimore now living in England, took her eighth singles title, defeating McGregor Stewart of Baltimore 11-9, 11-2.
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April 16, 1962

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BADMINTON—FERDINAND SONNEVILLE, a 31-year-old economics student from Indonesia and a Dutch citizen, defeated Tan Joe Hok of Indonesia, rated best player in the world, 17-15, 18-17, in a tense final match in the national championships at Indiantown Gap, Pa. MRS. JUDY DEVLIN HASHMAN, a native of Baltimore now living in England, took her eighth singles title, defeating McGregor Stewart of Baltimore 11-9, 11-2.

BASKETBALL—NBA: BOSTON took its sixth straight Eastern Division title, but it wasn't easy this year. The best-of-seven series against Philadelphia's stubborn Warriors went to the last two seconds of the last game when Sam Jones sank a jump shot. Boston won the game 109-107 and the series 4-3. The Celtics went on to play the LOS ANGELES Lakers, who had won the Western Division title by beating Detroit 4-2. Bob Cousy, in masterful form when needed the most, and the Jones boys. Sam and K.C., pushed the Celtics to victory in the opener of the playoff" finals in Boston 122-108. But the next day the Lakers, led by Jerry West, with 40 points, won 129—122 to even the series one apiece and move the scene of the action to Los Angeles.

AAU: NASHVILLE BUSINESS COLLEGE, led by Nera White's 28 points, pushed by defending champion Wayland ( Texas) College, 63-38, to take its third women's title in five years, at St. Joseph, Mo.

BIDDY LEAGUE: A WICHITA, KANSAS team of boys up to age 12 held on to the lead to win the national title, 41—40. over a Jefferson Parish, La. team at Lakewood, N.J.. reversing last year's order of finish when the same two played for the championship.

BOATING—ALBERG-35, skippered by Dan Elliot of Newport Harbor Yacht Club, won the San Clemente Island ocean race from Los Angeles, a point-counter for both the Whitney and Ahmanson trophies, on corrected time of 22.3 hours. Joy, sailed by George Hart Jr. of Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, was runner-up, with 22.9 hours.

BOWLING—TOM HENNESSEY of St. Louis picked up a split in the final frame of the PBA tournament in Oklahoma City to take first prize of $5,000 and defeat Bill Bunetta of Fresno, Calif. 185-181.

BOXING—PAUL PENDER of Brookline, Mass. recovered the part of the world middleweight title ( Massachusetts, New York and Europe) that he lost to England's Terry Dowries in London last summer by left-jabbing Downes through their 15-round rematch in Boston, earning a unanimous decision (see page 66).

Henry Cooper kept his British and Empire heavyweight championship by slashing Joe Erskine of Wales over the eye in the ninth round of a scheduled 15-round match to get a TKO. It was his third victory over Erskine in their five fights.

GOLF—ARNOLD PALMER, DOW FINSTER-WALD and GARY PLAYER each finished the four rounds of the Masters tournament at Augusta with 280, for the first triple tie in the event's 26-year history, setting the stage for Monday's unprecedented playoff (see page 12).

HARNESS RACING—CADUCEUS ($13.60), a 12-year-old stallion from New Zealand, took advantage of an early speed duel between Irvin Paul and Stormy Dream to win the $20.000 Californian Pace at Santa Anita in 1:57 2/5, the fastest race mile since 1960. Raced perfectly by Santa Anita's leading driver, Jim Dennis. Caduceus won by a length, with Irvin Paul second and Mr. Budlong third. Stormy Dream, who turned in the season's first 2-minute mile in beating the same horses a week ago, faded to last in the six-horse field.

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