SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
July 09, 1962
CHESS—TIGRAN PETROSIAN, the methodical Russian master, won the Candidates' Tournament in Willemstad, Curacao with a total of 17� points, consisting of eight wins, no losses and 19 draws. Ewfim Geller and Paul Keres, also Russians, lied for second place with 17 points and Bobby Fischer, the American prodigy, was fourth with 14. Petrosian has now earned the right to challenge countryman Mikhail Botvinnik for the world championship in 1963.
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July 09, 1962

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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CHESS—TIGRAN PETROSIAN, the methodical Russian master, won the Candidates' Tournament in Willemstad, Curacao with a total of 17� points, consisting of eight wins, no losses and 19 draws. Ewfim Geller and Paul Keres, also Russians, lied for second place with 17 points and Bobby Fischer, the American prodigy, was fourth with 14. Petrosian has now earned the right to challenge countryman Mikhail Botvinnik for the world championship in 1963.

FOOTBALL—ROMAN GABRIEL of North Carolina State and BOB FERGUSON of Ohio State led the East All-Stars to a 13-8 victory over the West in the All-America bowl game at Buffalo. The East scored first as Gabriel, a future Los Angeles Ram, plunged over from the one-yard line on a quarterback sneak in the third period. The West came back to take the lead late in the third period when Tom Hall of Minnesota ran 70 yards for a touchdown after intercepting a Gabriel pass and college teammate Sandy Stephens ran the ball over for a two-point conversion. Ferguson (voted the most valuable player of the game) raced 38 yards for the final score in the fourth period as the East avenged last year's loss to the West. For the first time, Big Ten contemporaries Woody Hayes of Ohio State and Murray Warmath of Minnesota opposed each other as grid masterminds, with Hayes coaching the East and Warmath the West.

GOLF—JACKY CUPIT, hard pressed by Billy Casper's four-under-par 67 on the final round, shot a par 71 to finish with a 72-hole total of 281, two strokes under Casper, to win the $54,000 Western Open in Chicago. Gary Player, trying for his first triumph since the 1961 Masters, faded on the last 18 holes to tie for third at 286 with Fred Hawkins.

Murle Mackenzie Lindstrom of Cape Girardeau. Mo. nude up a record five strokes in the final round to win the U.S. Women's Open at Myrtle Beach, S.C. (see page 12). Mrs. Lindstrom, at 23, equaled Mickey Wright's 1958 feat as the youngest Open winner. Jo Ann Prentice and Ruth Jessen tied for second, two strokes back with a 15-over-par 303 for 72 holes. Mrs. Lindstrom, after five years without a victory, had planned to make this her last tournament but conceded that she would now reconsider the matter.

HARNESS RACING—IRVIN PAUL ($16.20) set a new world record for two miles on a half-mile track while winning the $75,000 National Championship pace at Yonkers. The brilliant 5-year-old, co-owned by Abraham Wilsker and Driver Charles King, was last through most of the grueling race but stepped home in a blazing 4:08 4/5, breaking Scottish Pence's record of 4:13 2/5 set in 1951. Vicki's Jet was a length and a half behind Irvin Paul and had the same margin over favorite Henry T. Adios as Royal Rick clopped in fourth.

Duke Rodney ($2.80) shaved a full second off the track record for the mile with a time of 2:00[1/5] and won the $58,745 American-National Maturity trot at Sportsman's Park. William Haughton drove the stallion to a comfortable seven-length victory over favorite Orbiter, making Owners Mr. and Mrs. Pat DiGennaro $29,370 richer. The same night DARN SAFE passed Su Mac Lad as America's leading money winner among trotters by winning a mile trot. The 11-year-old veteran collected first money of $2,000 to "boost his earnings to $457,327, compared to $455,499 for Su Mac Lad.

HORSE RACING—TAMBOURINE II (15 to 2), making only his fourth start, won the $190,400 Irish Sweeps Derby in record time of 2:28[4/5], over the mile-and-a-half distance (see page 18). Mrs. Howell Jackson's American-bred, American-owned colt won Europe's richest race by a short head from the Irish colt Arctic Storm. Two other American owners had horses in the first four as Townsend Martin's Sebring finished third and Raymond Guest's Larkspur, the favorite, was fourth.

No Resisting ($13.80) ended Affectionately's string of victories at six by winning the $23,900 Colleen Stakes at Monmouth Park. Larry Gilligan rode Mrs. Henry Phipps's filly over the five and a half furlongs in 1:05 1/5 to beat favorite Affectionately by two and a half lengths.

MOTOR SPORTS—BRUCE McLAREN, a former New Zealand Rugby star, drove his Cooper-Climax to victory in the Grand Prix of Reims. McLaren sped around the 250-mile course in 2:02.3, averaging 126 mph. Graham Hill of England was second, eight seconds back, in a B.R.M.

Roger Penske of Gladwyne, Pa., driving a Cooper-Tellar. set a one-lap course record and lapped the field to win the feature race at Lime Rock, Conn. Penske had one lap of 1:03.4 and nine other laps under 1.04 to thoroughly eclipse George Constantine's old record of 1:04.3.

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