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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 30, 1962
SUBSTANDARD LARDSirs: President John F. Kennedy's article (The Vigor We Need, July 16) gives to the public a sound, fundamental program for development of good, rugged individuals of all ages.DAVID D. SPILLMAN Bethlehem, Pa.
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July 30, 1962

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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SUBSTANDARD LARD
Sirs:
President John F. Kennedy's article (The Vigor We Need, July 16) gives to the public a sound, fundamental program for development of good, rugged individuals of all ages.
DAVID D. SPILLMAN
Bethlehem, Pa.

Sirs:
The standards Bud Wilkinson sets forth for physical fitness are nearly as shameful as the prevalent substandard body conditions he complains about. Three pull-ups are considered passing for 17-year-old boys. Fourteen sit-ups are supposedly sufficient for the same age. Four squat-thrusts set the standard also. These weak criteria are for barrel-bellied old folks, not young men.

At age 17 I was capable of at least eight pull-ups, 100 sit-ups, and six or seven squat-thrusts in 10 seconds; so was over half of my high school class. And it need not be said that this was without intensive training—just normal fitness.
EVAN Y. SEMERJIAN
Belmont, Mass.

Sirs:
Let no parent or school board be duped into believing that pull-ups, sit-ups and squat-thrusts will produce physically educated youth. We have a nutrition problem along with our exercise problem. The lard of our affluency will have to be melted off before we can do much for the muscles.
ANNE F. MILLAN
Worcester, Mass.

Sirs:
With the right kind of direction, the kids themselves will be only too willing to sell the idea of fitness to their schoolmates.
REV. ROLLAND L. STAIR, C.S.C.
Notre Dame, Ind.

POWER IN THE WIND
Sirs:
In regard to Arthur Zich's recent critical article on the Miami-Nassau powerboat race {Bloody Nose for a Boa! Race, May 14), I thought you might be interested to know what we are doing to improve this race.

Race Chairman Red Crise called a group of us together on July 7 to discuss rules for ocean powerboat racing. When you sit down and try to devise an intelligent set of specifications governing the eligibility of various types of boats for participation in this type of racing, the problem becomes complex to the point where solution by this route seems virtually impossible. The objective is to bar freaks that could only win in calm weather, but when you start writing definitions the task becomes hopeless. We finally hit upon a solution that was embraced enthusiastically by all hands and will bring the race back to what it was designed to be—"the most rugged ocean powerboat race in the world." It was decided that unless the anemometer on the weather bureau in Miami at 7 a.m. the morning of the race was reading 10 knots or better, the race would not be started. Ten knots of wind is enough to kick up a good sea in the Gulf Stream and the chances are, if it is blowing 10 at 7 o'clock in the morning, it will breeze up plenty as the day progresses. Of course, the race will be postponed if small-craft warnings are flying.

This rule emphasizes the objective of this race—a test of boats, power and equipment in rough water. And the beauty of this rule is that the sea and not man is the judge.
RICHARD BERTRAM
Miami

ANOTHER LOOK AT LUCAS
Sirs:
Mother Lucas' protestations on behalf of son Jerry (19TH HOLE, July 16) have an even more hollow ring in view of the latest manipulations, which landed Jerry, by his own consent, in the National Basketball Association, but not with the Cincinnati team. The real issue stands out boldly: Jerry Lucas would not play with Cincinnati under any circumstances.

This is certainly Jerry's prerogative and perhaps a very understandable one. Surely we would like to have had him, but in the final analysis Oscar Robertson will always be Cincinnati's first basketball love. We will welcome the opportunity to see Oscar and Jerry in competition with each other, and I think I speak for 99% of the Cincinnati fans when I say, "No hard feelings, Jerry. Good luck in your career."
A. E. HENDERSON
Cincinnati

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